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T-cells from common colds may help fight Covid: Study

Omicron Variant, Delta Plus Covid variant, Delta Covid-19 variant, Coronavirus, Health, Research, Study, Researchers, COVID 19, Novel Coronavirus, Fight Against Corona, Covaxin, Covishield, Oxygen, SARS-CoV-2, Sputnik V, Oxygen Plants, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca, Oxygen Concentrator, Remdesivir, Liquid Medical Oxygen, Oximeter

Web Admin

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5 Dariya News

London , 12 Jan 2022

People with higher levels of T-cells from common cold coronaviruses are less likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2, according to a new research.The study, by Imperial College London researchers, provides the first evidence of a protective role for these T-cells.While previous studies have shown that T-cells induced by other coronaviruses can recognise SARS-CoV-2, the new study, published in Nature Communications, examines for the first time how the presence of these T-cells at the time of SARS-CoV-2 exposure influences whether someone becomes infected.The researchers also stated their findings provide a blueprint for a second-generation, universal vaccine that could prevent infection from current and future SARS-CoV-2 variants, including Omicron.

"Being exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus doesn't always result in infection, and we've been keen to understand why. We found that high levels of pre-existing T cells, created by the body when infected with other human coronaviruses like the common cold, can protect against Covid-19 infection," said Dr Rhia Kundu, from Imperial's National Heart and Lung Institute."While this is an important discovery, it is only one form of protection, and I would stress that no one should rely on this alone. Instead, the best way to protect yourself against Covid-19 is to be fully vaccinated, including getting your booster dose," she added.The study included 52 people who lived with someone with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and who had therefore been exposed to the virus. 

The participants did PCR tests at the outset and 4 and 7 days later, to determine if they developed an infection.Blood samples from the 52 participants were taken within 1-6 days of them being exposed to the virus. This enabled the researchers to analyse the levels of pre-existing T-cells induced by previous common cold coronavirus infections that also cross-recognise proteins of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.The researchers found that there were significantly higher levels of these cross-reactive T-cells in the 26 people who did not become infected, compared to the 26 people who did become infected. These T-cells targeted internal proteins within the SARS-CoV-2 virus, rather than the spike protein on the surface of the virus, to protect against infection.Current vaccines do not induce an immune response to these internal proteins. The researchers said that - alongside our existing effective spike protein-targeting vaccines - these internal proteins offer a new vaccine target that could provide long-lasting protection because T-cell responses persist longer than antibody responses which wane within a few months of vaccination.

 

Tags: Omicron Variant , Delta Plus Covid variant , Delta Covid-19 variant , Coronavirus , Health , Research , Study , Researchers , COVID 19 , Novel Coronavirus , Fight Against Corona , Covaxin , Covishield , Oxygen , SARS-CoV-2 , Sputnik V , Oxygen Plants , Pfizer , Astra Zeneca , Oxygen Concentrator , Remdesivir , Liquid Medical Oxygen , Oximeter

 

 

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