Updated on Oct 17, 2017 22:09:46

 

 

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17-Oct-2017 New York

This tool can better identify breast cancer risk

A machine learning tool can help identify which high-risk breast lesions are likely to become cancerous with 97 per cent accuracy, an advance that may help reduce unnecessary surgeries, a study has revealed.High-risk breast lesions are biopsy-diagnosed...

17-Oct-2017 New York

Twitter, Instagram promoting 'extreme thinness': Study

Twitter and Instagram posts are increasingly celebrating "bonespiration" and "thinspiration", which encourage eating disorders, such as anorexia, a study has found.Researchers showed that there has been an alarming rise in the number of social media posts promoting...

14-Oct-2017 moscow

Neurological disease deaths up 36% in 25 years: Study

The number of deaths due to neurological disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, stroke and epilepsy has increased by 36.7 per cent worldwide between 1990 and 2015, a study says.In 2015, these diseases comprised of 16.8 per cent of global deaths,...

14-Oct-2017 London

Magic mushrooms may 'reset' depressed brains: Study

A psychoactive compound occuring naturally in "magic mushrooms" may help reduce symptoms of depression as well as "reset" brain activity in affected patients, a study has shown.The findings demonstrated that Psilocybin mushrooms, also known as psychedelic...

10-Oct-2017 New Delhi

Mumbaikars worst hit by stress: Study

Among Indian citizens, 31 per cent working professionals in Mumbai suffer from stress, revealed a study on Tuesday.The study, conducted by Lybrate, an online doctor consultation platform, revealed that nearly 60 per cent working professionals in Tier 1 cities...

05-Oct-2017 New Delhi

Flight tickets drop two weeks prior to festival: Study

Amidst the festive madness also exist the perennial late travellers woes -- but according to a latest study by global search engine Skyscanner, flight prices from Delhi, Mumbai and Bengaluru all see a drop two weeks prior to the festival period before sharply...

05-Oct-2017 London

Half of new cancer drugs not showing survival gains: Study

Nearly half of new cancer drugs approved in Europe show little evidence that they are helping extend or improve life, says a new study.Even where drugs did show survival gains over existing treatments, these were often marginal, found the researchers based...

04-Oct-2017 New York

Drinking black tea may help you lose weight

Love to drink black tea? It may be as beneficial as green tea in preventing obesity and promoting well-being, researchers say.The findings showed that chemicals found in black tea -- called polyphenols -- alters energy metabolism in the liver by changing...

03-Oct-2017 London

Schizophrenia, bipolar disorder share gene variant: Study

Researchers have identified a genetic variant that is associated with multiple psychiatric disorders and drives changes in a brain network, thereby increasing an individual's risk of developing bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.Schizophrenia is a primary psychotic...

01-Oct-2017 New York

This protein may improve flu symptoms, cut death risk

Researchers have identified a small protein that could potentially improve the symptoms and mortality associated with the flu and possibly other types of infectious illness as well.The protein called retrocyclin-101 (RC-101) is unique in that it not only targets...

29-Sep-2017 New York

Harassing employees may cut your well-being: Study

Are you a boss who bullies and belittles juniors? Beware, your well-being may be at risk, new research suggests.The researchers have found that supervisors who were abusive felt a sense of recovery because their boorish behaviour helped replenish their mental...

29-Sep-2017 WASHINGTON

Homo sapiens emerged 350,000 years ago: Study

 Genetic data from seven humans who lived 2,500 years ago in South Africa suggest that Homo sapiens arose 350,000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought, a new study has revealed.Swedish and South African scientists managed to identify the genetic sequence...

29-Sep-2017 Sydney

Sharks, rays live longer than previously estimated: Study

An Australian university study published on Friday found a number of errors in the way the age of sharks and rays have been measured, and which actually live 18 years longer than previously estimated.James Cook University researcher Alastair Harry conducted...

27-Sep-2017 Chicago

One in five US teens suffers from concussion: Study

Researchers from University of Michigan found that one out of five teens in the US reported at least one concussion diagnosis, and 5.5 per cent of them have had more than one concussion, according to a new study released on Tuesday.The study, published in the Journal...

20-Sep-2017 New York

Exposure to pet, pest allergens in infancy may cut asthma risk

Children exposed to high indoor levels of pet or pest allergens during infancy are likely to have a lower risk of developing asthma by 7 years of age, a new study has revealed.The findings suggested that children who were exposed to higher concentrations of cockroach,...

19-Sep-2017 Sydney

Taking a break from dieting could be key to weight loss

Struggling hard to lose weight even with a controlled diet? Avoid continuous dieting and take a two-week break as this may help keep the kilos off, suggests a new study.According to researchers, dieting altered a series of biological processes in the body, which...

18-Sep-2017 New York

High BP can cause organ damage in teenagers too

Is your teenage son or daughter suffering from high blood pressure? Beware, if left uncontrolled the condition can lead to organ damage as in adults, according to a research.The findings showed that organ damage -- damage to the heart and blood vessels...

14-Sep-2017 New York

Endometriosis may up risk of complications in pregnancy

Pregnant women with endometriosis -- a chronic gynecologic disease -- are at greater risk for a hostof mplications during pregnancy and at delivery, including preterm birth and cesarean section, a study has showed.The study showed that women with endometriosis...

31-Aug-2017 New York

Breastfeeding may help reduce risk of endometriosis

Women who breastfed for longer periods of time had significantly lower risk of being diagnosed with endometriosis -- a gynecologic disorder characterised by chronic pelvic pain and painful periods, according to researchers.The findings showed that for every...

30-Aug-2017 Toronto

Eating low fat, high carbohydrate foods may kill you

People who consume foods that are low in fats but high in carbohydrates may be at an increased risk of an early death as compared to those who consume fat-rich foods such as cheese and butter, a study has claimed.The findings, published in the journal Lancet,...

29-Aug-2017 New York

Anti-inflammatory drug may reduce risk of lung cancer

Researchers have found that an existing anti-inflammatory drug has the potential to lower lung cancer risk.According to a study published in the journal Lancet, death from cancer was reduced by half in the group of people who received the highest dosage of the drug...

23-Aug-2017 New York

Long-term Vitamin B use may up men's lung cancer risk

Long-term, high-dose supplementation of vitamins B6 and B12 -- touted by the vitamin industry for increasing energy and improving metabolism -- may be associated with a two to four fold increased risk of lung cancer in men, new research has warned.The findings...

23-Aug-2017 Toronto

AI system to help detect skin cancer

Researchers are developing an Artificial Intelligence (AI)-based system that could help detect melanoma skin cancer earlier.The technology employs machine-learning software to analyse images of skin lesions and provides doctors with objective data on telltale biomarkers...

22-Aug-2017 Seoul

New electronic skin tracks heart rate, respiration

Taking the technology of wearables to the next level, researchers have developed a new electronic skin that tracks heart rate, respiration, muscle movement and other health data, and wirelessly transmits it to a smartphone.The electronic skin developed by South...

20-Aug-2017 New York

Stories with human characters influence children more

Children learn moral lessons more effectively from stories with human characters than with "cute" human-like animals, a new study has revealed.The study, carried out by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of...

20-Aug-2017 London

Now an artificial heart made of spider silk

Researchers have developed cardiac muscle tissue made of spider silk, to investigate whether artificial silk protein could be suitable for engineering cardiac tissue.Ischaemic diseases such as cardiac infarction leads to irreversible loss of cardiac muscle cells,...

19-Aug-2017 Toronto

High BP during pregnancy may up heart disease risk later

Women who experience high blood pressure condition during pregnancy are likely to face an increased risk of heart disease and hypertension later in life, according to a study.Hypertension or high blood pressure is a condition in which the force of the blood...

18-Aug-2017 New York

Eating hamburgers, pizza may increase cancer risk : Study

Besides contributing to weight gain in adults, energy dense foods such as hamburgers and pizza may also increase risk of cancer, suggests new research.The researchers wanted to find out how the ratio of energy to food weight, otherwise known as dietary energy...

18-Aug-2017 London

E-cigarettes may promote smoking among teenagers

Researchers have identified a "robust association" between e-cigarette use among teenagers and the increased probability of smoking a cigarette within a year."The findings suggest that among the teenagers who had never smoked, the use of e-cigarettes was a strong...

17-Aug-2017 London

High-intensity exercise may help combat diabetes risk

Indulging in high-intensity interval training may be an efficient, effective way of reducing the risk of developing diabetes, especially among women.Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that affects the way the body processes blood sugar (glucose) and...

14-Aug-2017 New York

New blood test may improve cancer treatment

Stanford University scientists have developed a new type of low-cost blood test that has the potential for quickly tracking cancer growth and spread.The test requires only a fraction of a tube of blood and can detect genetic mutations in minute amounts of DNA...

12-Aug-2017 New York

A handful of almonds daily may boost your good cholesterol

Munching about a handful of almonds daily may help boost the level of good cholesterol in the body as well as improve its functionality, new research suggests.The findings showed that the almonds not just increased the levels of good cholesterol -- high-density...

10-Jul-2017 London

Diabetes, sleep apnoea may accelerate risk of eye disease

Diabetes patients who are also suffering from obstructive sleep apnoea may be at greater risk of developing a common form of eye disease leading to blindness, researchers found.Diabetic retinopathy -- the most common form of eye disease -- affects between 40...

10-Jul-2017 London

Anti-gravity treadmill may boost confidence post knee surgery

Using space age technology, a British scientist has developed an anti-gravity treadmill that can help people reduce their fears of re-injury as well as boost their confidence after knee operations.The anti-gravity treadmill could provide a great environment...

10-Jul-2017 New York

Decoded : How lifting heavy weights boosts muscle strength

Lifting heavy weights may help you enhance your muscle strength more than light weight training because the nervous system facilitates improvements in strength during high-load training, researchers suggests.The study aimed to find out how the brain and motor...

09-Jul-2017 London

Childhood obesity may lead to hip disease

Obesity may put children at increased risk of hip disease, a condition that can cause life-long morbidity, suggests new research.Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease of adolescence. The condition always requires surgery, can...

08-Jul-2017 New York

How does prenatal alcohol exposure raise addiction risk

Babies' exposure to alcohol in the womb causes alteration in the brain's reward system, which then increases their risk for drug addiction later in life, according to a study.The key appears to lie with endocannibinoids -- cannabis-like chemicals that are produced...

07-Jul-2017 London

Simple test may warn of bladder cancer's return

Researchers have devised a simple test for an earlier and more accurate warning of returning bladder cancer than existing methods.Testing the urine of 348 bladder cancer patients for a faulty protein called TERT, researchers from the University Hospital of Lyon...

07-Jul-2017 New York

New computer code to help robots understand body language

Researchers have developed a computer code that could help robots understand body poses and movements, allowing them to perceive what people around them are doing, what moods they are in and whether they can be interrupted."We communicate almost as much with the...

07-Jul-2017 Toronto

Marijuana may up psychosis risk in teenagers

Daily consumption of marijuana may increase an adolescent's risk of having recurrent psychotic-like experiences by 159 per cent, according to a new study.The psychotic-like experiences include the experiences of perceptual aberration -- for example feeling...

07-Jul-2017 London

Soon, smartphone app could detect fake products

Researchers have developed a technology that could make identifying fake products as convenient as simply scanning them with a smartphone app.Whether aerospace parts or luxury goods, the new technology will make counterfeiting impossible, said the researchers."It...

06-Jul-2017 New York

Extramarital sex more among older Americans

In a surprising discovery, a new study reveals that married people in the US over age 55 engage in extramarital sex more often than younger Americans.Based on analysis of data from the General Social Survey, the researchers found that just 14 per cent of...

06-Jul-2017 New York

Mere smell of food may make you fat

Your sense of smell that helps in enjoying the food may be inadvertently making you fat while the lack of it may trick the body into thinking it has already eaten, researchers say.The findings revealed that obese mice that lost sense of smell lost weight...

06-Jul-2017 New York

Disrupted sleep may predict Alzheimer's risk

Lack of proper sleep may predict the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in people who are otherwise healthy, researchers claim.Findings of a study in the US showed that people who reported worse sleep quality, more sleep problems and daytime sleepiness...

06-Jul-2017 London

High sugar intake in pregnancy linked to asthma risk in kids

Women who consume excessive sugar in their diet during their pregnancy may increase the risk of allergy and allergic asthma in their children, a study has claimed.The findings by researchers from the Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), revealed that in...

04-Jul-2017 London

3-D printed models to improve heart valve replacements

Using three-dimensional (3-D) printing technologies, researchers have created patient-specific heart valve models that can mimic the physiological qualities of the real valves and could assist cardiologists in preparing to perform life-saving heart valve replacements.The...

04-Jul-2017 Washington

High-fat diet in pregnancy may up breast cancer risk

High-fat diet in pregnancy may increase the risk of breast cancer over generations, a new study has revealed.Feeding pregnant female mice a diet high in fat derived from common corn oil resulted in genetic changes that substantially increased the susceptibility...

02-Jul-2017 New York

Test identifies breast cancer patients with lowest death risk

In an important step forward for personalising care for women with breast cancer, researchers have found that a molecular test can pinpoint which patients will have a very low risk of death from breast cancer even 20 years after diagnosis and tumour removal.As...

01-Jul-2017 New York

Research : Protein key to common respiratory virus identified

Scientists have identified the structure of a key protein behind a common respiratory virus, a finding that may provide a potential target for vaccines or treatments for the illness.Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a very common virus that leads to mild, cold-like...

29-Jun-2017 London

Aspirin may cut preeclampsia risk in pregnant women

Women who take low dose of aspirin daily during the first trimester of pregnancy can significantly decrease their risk of developing preeclampsia -- a condition characterised by high blood pressure that can cause premature birth, maternal and foetal death,...

27-Jun-2017 New York

Childhood asthma may up risk of heart failure

Individuals with a history of asthma from childhood may be at a greater risk of experiencing shortness of breath, chest pain, fainting and eventually heart failure in adulthood, researchers have warned.The study showed that childhood asthma may lead to thickening...

27-Jun-2017 New York

Night shifts may hamper DNA repair

If you are working on night shifts regularly, chances are your body's ability to repair DNA damage may get hampered, suggest researchers led by one of Indian-origin.The findings suggested that night shifts suppress the production of 'sleep hormone' melatonin.It...

26-Jun-2017 New York

Gene, air pollution together spike autism risk

Individuals with high levels of genetic variation and elevated exposure to a type of air pollution may be at an increased risk of developing autism, a new analysis shows.The findings showed that environmental factors like exposure to air pollution (ozone, nitrogen...

26-Jun-2017 London

This technique uses body's noise to detect cancer early

An emerging technology that uses the body's own "seismic noise", allows more effective imaging deep inside body to assist in tumour, scientists say.Elastography, sometimes referred as seismology of the human body, measures the elasticity of biological tissue...

22-Jun-2017 London

Sex can boost brain power in older adults

Staying busy in your bedroom even after age 50 could be good for your brain as researchers have found that older adults who have sex more frequently do better in brain function tests.The researchers found that those who engaged in more regular sexual activity...

22-Jun-2017 London

Breastfeeding may cut mother's heart attack risk

Breastfeeding may reduce a mother's heart attack and stroke risk later in life, according to new research.The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, showed that women who breastfed their babies had about a 10 percent lower risk of developing...

19-Jun-2017 London

New 3-in-1 blood test to aid precision prostate cancer therapy

Opening the door to precision medicine for prostate cancer, researchers have developed a three-in-one blood test that could tell which men would benefit from a class of new drugs, detect early signs of resistance and monitor cancer's evolution over time.The...

19-Jun-2017 Mumbai

85% diabetics see amputations in their lifetime

Eighty-five per cent of diabetics see amputations in their lifetime due to lack of appropriate treatment, data released during a national conference on diabetics here has revealed.Currently 15 per cent of of India's diabetic population suffers from ulcers in their...

18-Jun-2017 London

Researchers develop rapid blood test for malaria diagnosis

Researchers have developed an automated rapid blood test that could make malaria diagnosis faster and more reliable than it is now.The new method enables the diagnosis of the disease with 97 per cent accuracy, Technical University of Munich (TUM) said in a statement.According...

17-Jun-2017 London

Childhood passive smoking may up arthritis risk later

Exposure to passive smoking in childhood significantly increased the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in adult smokers, a study has showed.Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting many joints, including those in the hands and feet.The...

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