Updated on Aug 23, 2017 08:15:51

 

 

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22-Aug-2017 Seoul

New electronic skin tracks heart rate, respiration

Taking the technology of wearables to the next level, researchers have developed a new electronic skin that tracks heart rate, respiration, muscle movement and other health data, and wirelessly transmits it to a smartphone.The electronic skin developed by South...

20-Aug-2017 New York

Stories with human characters influence children more

Children learn moral lessons more effectively from stories with human characters than with "cute" human-like animals, a new study has revealed.The study, carried out by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of...

20-Aug-2017 London

Now an artificial heart made of spider silk

Researchers have developed cardiac muscle tissue made of spider silk, to investigate whether artificial silk protein could be suitable for engineering cardiac tissue.Ischaemic diseases such as cardiac infarction leads to irreversible loss of cardiac muscle cells,...

19-Aug-2017 Toronto

High BP during pregnancy may up heart disease risk later

Women who experience high blood pressure condition during pregnancy are likely to face an increased risk of heart disease and hypertension later in life, according to a study.Hypertension or high blood pressure is a condition in which the force of the blood...

18-Aug-2017 New York

Eating hamburgers, pizza may increase cancer risk : Study

Besides contributing to weight gain in adults, energy dense foods such as hamburgers and pizza may also increase risk of cancer, suggests new research.The researchers wanted to find out how the ratio of energy to food weight, otherwise known as dietary energy...

18-Aug-2017 London

E-cigarettes may promote smoking among teenagers

Researchers have identified a "robust association" between e-cigarette use among teenagers and the increased probability of smoking a cigarette within a year."The findings suggest that among the teenagers who had never smoked, the use of e-cigarettes was a strong...

17-Aug-2017 London

High-intensity exercise may help combat diabetes risk

Indulging in high-intensity interval training may be an efficient, effective way of reducing the risk of developing diabetes, especially among women.Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that affects the way the body processes blood sugar (glucose) and...

14-Aug-2017 New York

New blood test may improve cancer treatment

Stanford University scientists have developed a new type of low-cost blood test that has the potential for quickly tracking cancer growth and spread.The test requires only a fraction of a tube of blood and can detect genetic mutations in minute amounts of DNA...

12-Aug-2017 New York

A handful of almonds daily may boost your good cholesterol

Munching about a handful of almonds daily may help boost the level of good cholesterol in the body as well as improve its functionality, new research suggests.The findings showed that the almonds not just increased the levels of good cholesterol -- high-density...

10-Jul-2017 London

Diabetes, sleep apnoea may accelerate risk of eye disease

Diabetes patients who are also suffering from obstructive sleep apnoea may be at greater risk of developing a common form of eye disease leading to blindness, researchers found.Diabetic retinopathy -- the most common form of eye disease -- affects between 40...

10-Jul-2017 London

Anti-gravity treadmill may boost confidence post knee surgery

Using space age technology, a British scientist has developed an anti-gravity treadmill that can help people reduce their fears of re-injury as well as boost their confidence after knee operations.The anti-gravity treadmill could provide a great environment...

10-Jul-2017 New York

Decoded : How lifting heavy weights boosts muscle strength

Lifting heavy weights may help you enhance your muscle strength more than light weight training because the nervous system facilitates improvements in strength during high-load training, researchers suggests.The study aimed to find out how the brain and motor...

09-Jul-2017 London

Childhood obesity may lead to hip disease

Obesity may put children at increased risk of hip disease, a condition that can cause life-long morbidity, suggests new research.Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease of adolescence. The condition always requires surgery, can...

08-Jul-2017 New York

How does prenatal alcohol exposure raise addiction risk

Babies' exposure to alcohol in the womb causes alteration in the brain's reward system, which then increases their risk for drug addiction later in life, according to a study.The key appears to lie with endocannibinoids -- cannabis-like chemicals that are produced...

07-Jul-2017 London

Simple test may warn of bladder cancer's return

Researchers have devised a simple test for an earlier and more accurate warning of returning bladder cancer than existing methods.Testing the urine of 348 bladder cancer patients for a faulty protein called TERT, researchers from the University Hospital of Lyon...

07-Jul-2017 New York

New computer code to help robots understand body language

Researchers have developed a computer code that could help robots understand body poses and movements, allowing them to perceive what people around them are doing, what moods they are in and whether they can be interrupted."We communicate almost as much with the...

07-Jul-2017 Toronto

Marijuana may up psychosis risk in teenagers

Daily consumption of marijuana may increase an adolescent's risk of having recurrent psychotic-like experiences by 159 per cent, according to a new study.The psychotic-like experiences include the experiences of perceptual aberration -- for example feeling...

07-Jul-2017 London

Soon, smartphone app could detect fake products

Researchers have developed a technology that could make identifying fake products as convenient as simply scanning them with a smartphone app.Whether aerospace parts or luxury goods, the new technology will make counterfeiting impossible, said the researchers."It...

06-Jul-2017 New York

Extramarital sex more among older Americans

In a surprising discovery, a new study reveals that married people in the US over age 55 engage in extramarital sex more often than younger Americans.Based on analysis of data from the General Social Survey, the researchers found that just 14 per cent of...

06-Jul-2017 New York

Mere smell of food may make you fat

Your sense of smell that helps in enjoying the food may be inadvertently making you fat while the lack of it may trick the body into thinking it has already eaten, researchers say.The findings revealed that obese mice that lost sense of smell lost weight...

06-Jul-2017 New York

Disrupted sleep may predict Alzheimer's risk

Lack of proper sleep may predict the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in people who are otherwise healthy, researchers claim.Findings of a study in the US showed that people who reported worse sleep quality, more sleep problems and daytime sleepiness...

06-Jul-2017 London

High sugar intake in pregnancy linked to asthma risk in kids

Women who consume excessive sugar in their diet during their pregnancy may increase the risk of allergy and allergic asthma in their children, a study has claimed.The findings by researchers from the Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), revealed that in...

04-Jul-2017 London

3-D printed models to improve heart valve replacements

Using three-dimensional (3-D) printing technologies, researchers have created patient-specific heart valve models that can mimic the physiological qualities of the real valves and could assist cardiologists in preparing to perform life-saving heart valve replacements.The...

04-Jul-2017 Washington

High-fat diet in pregnancy may up breast cancer risk

High-fat diet in pregnancy may increase the risk of breast cancer over generations, a new study has revealed.Feeding pregnant female mice a diet high in fat derived from common corn oil resulted in genetic changes that substantially increased the susceptibility...

02-Jul-2017 New York

Test identifies breast cancer patients with lowest death risk

In an important step forward for personalising care for women with breast cancer, researchers have found that a molecular test can pinpoint which patients will have a very low risk of death from breast cancer even 20 years after diagnosis and tumour removal.As...

01-Jul-2017 New York

Research : Protein key to common respiratory virus identified

Scientists have identified the structure of a key protein behind a common respiratory virus, a finding that may provide a potential target for vaccines or treatments for the illness.Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a very common virus that leads to mild, cold-like...

29-Jun-2017 London

Aspirin may cut preeclampsia risk in pregnant women

Women who take low dose of aspirin daily during the first trimester of pregnancy can significantly decrease their risk of developing preeclampsia -- a condition characterised by high blood pressure that can cause premature birth, maternal and foetal death,...

27-Jun-2017 New York

Childhood asthma may up risk of heart failure

Individuals with a history of asthma from childhood may be at a greater risk of experiencing shortness of breath, chest pain, fainting and eventually heart failure in adulthood, researchers have warned.The study showed that childhood asthma may lead to thickening...

27-Jun-2017 New York

Night shifts may hamper DNA repair

If you are working on night shifts regularly, chances are your body's ability to repair DNA damage may get hampered, suggest researchers led by one of Indian-origin.The findings suggested that night shifts suppress the production of 'sleep hormone' melatonin.It...

26-Jun-2017 New York

Gene, air pollution together spike autism risk

Individuals with high levels of genetic variation and elevated exposure to a type of air pollution may be at an increased risk of developing autism, a new analysis shows.The findings showed that environmental factors like exposure to air pollution (ozone, nitrogen...

26-Jun-2017 London

This technique uses body's noise to detect cancer early

An emerging technology that uses the body's own "seismic noise", allows more effective imaging deep inside body to assist in tumour, scientists say.Elastography, sometimes referred as seismology of the human body, measures the elasticity of biological tissue...

22-Jun-2017 London

Sex can boost brain power in older adults

Staying busy in your bedroom even after age 50 could be good for your brain as researchers have found that older adults who have sex more frequently do better in brain function tests.The researchers found that those who engaged in more regular sexual activity...

22-Jun-2017 London

Breastfeeding may cut mother's heart attack risk

Breastfeeding may reduce a mother's heart attack and stroke risk later in life, according to new research.The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, showed that women who breastfed their babies had about a 10 percent lower risk of developing...

19-Jun-2017 London

New 3-in-1 blood test to aid precision prostate cancer therapy

Opening the door to precision medicine for prostate cancer, researchers have developed a three-in-one blood test that could tell which men would benefit from a class of new drugs, detect early signs of resistance and monitor cancer's evolution over time.The...

19-Jun-2017 Mumbai

85% diabetics see amputations in their lifetime

Eighty-five per cent of diabetics see amputations in their lifetime due to lack of appropriate treatment, data released during a national conference on diabetics here has revealed.Currently 15 per cent of of India's diabetic population suffers from ulcers in their...

18-Jun-2017 London

Researchers develop rapid blood test for malaria diagnosis

Researchers have developed an automated rapid blood test that could make malaria diagnosis faster and more reliable than it is now.The new method enables the diagnosis of the disease with 97 per cent accuracy, Technical University of Munich (TUM) said in a statement.According...

17-Jun-2017 London

Childhood passive smoking may up arthritis risk later

Exposure to passive smoking in childhood significantly increased the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in adult smokers, a study has showed.Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting many joints, including those in the hands and feet.The...

13-Jun-2017 New York

What puts farmers at higher risk of suicide

Besides financial issues, which push many farmers to commit suicide especially during economic crises or periods of extreme weather, several other factors may drive farmers to take the extreme step, says a study."Occupational factors such as poor access to quality...

13-Jun-2017 New York

Vitamin A deficiency may increase TB risk

People with low levels of vitamin A living with individuals sick with tuberculosis (TB) may be 10 times more likely to develop the disease than people with high levels of the nutrient, new research has found.The findings suggests that vitamin A supplementation...

13-Jun-2017 Sydney

Diabetes drug may cut heart, kidney disease risk

A drug that lowers blood sugar levels for people with Type 2 diabetes may also significantly help reduce the risk of both cardiovascular and kidney disease, researchers claimed.Type 2 diabetes, which affects around 450 million people worldwide, also increases...

13-Jun-2017 London

Can gum disease delay pregnancy?

A common bacterium associated with gum disease may delay conception in young women, warns a new study."Our results encourage young women of fertile age to take care of their oral health and attend periodontal evaluations regularly," said one of the researchers...

11-Jun-2017 New York

Finger-stick blood test may not help type 2 diabetes treatment

New research has revealed that checking blood sugar with a finger-stick may not help type 2 diabetes patients who do not use insulin.Type 2 diabetes is an epidemic afflicting one in 11 people in the US and for those treated with insulin, checking blood sugar...

08-Jun-2017 Toronto

Eating red onions may help combat cancer

Dark red onions, known as the richest source of dietary flavonoids, may help fight off cancer of the colon and breast, a researcher has suggested.We found that onions are excellent at killing cancer cells," said Abdulmonem Murayyan, doctoral student at the...

07-Jun-2017 New York

An egg a day may spurt growth in kids

Eating an egg a day can significantly increase growth and reduce stunting by 47 per cent in young children, finds a study."Eggs can be affordable and easily accessible. It can be a good source of nutrients for growth and development in young children and have...

07-Jun-2017 Melbourne

Scientists begin trial of radiation injections for cancers

Australian scientists began a clinical trial of injecting radiotherapy to combat aggressive breast cancer, media reported on Wednesday.Women suffering from the most aggressive types of breast cancer will undergo treatment combining radiation with immunotherapy...

06-Jun-2017 London

Researchers find new potential target for cancer treatment

Paving the way for developing highly specific cancer drugs with fewer side-effects, researchers have discovered that cancer cells and normal cells use different 'gene switches' in order to regulate the expression of genes that control growth."Since we find...

05-Jun-2017 New York

Even mild sleep apnoea may up hypertension, diabetes risk

Young and middle-aged adults suffering from mild-to-moderate obstructive sleep apnoea with symptoms such as snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness, may be at an increased risk of developing hypertension and diabetes, researchers say.Obstructive sleep apnoea...

02-Jun-2017 New York

Baby teeth with heavy metals may predict autism risk

Baby teeth from children with autism contain more toxic lead and less of essential nutrients such as zinc and manganese, compared to teeth from children without autism, finds a study led by an Indian-origin researcher.The study showed that children with autism...

01-Jun-2017 London

Internet withdrawal may increase heart rate, BP

Just as a drug addict may face withdrawal symptoms, people who use the internet a lot may experience significant physiological changes such as increased heart rate and blood pressure when they go offline, scientists have found."We have known for some time...

31-May-2017 New York

How bacteria in your body may promote diabetes

While a large waistline and high blood sugar levels are known risk factors for diabetes, researchers have now found that having bacteria that penetrate the mucus lining of the colon may promote metabolic disease, particularly Type-2 diabetes.Metabolic syndrome,...

29-May-2017 New York

Marijuana use may increase gum disease risk

Frequent recreational use of cannabis -- including marijuana, hashish, and hash oil -- increases the risk of gum disease, says a study."It is well known that frequent tobacco use can increase the risk of periodontal disease, but it was surprising to see that...

29-May-2017 New York

Sugary diet may up risk of cancer : Study

Love to eat a sugar rich diet? Beware, it may fuel various forms of cancer by giving them the much needed energy to multiply, researchers say.The researchers found that one type of cancer called as squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) -- found in lung, head and...

26-May-2017 London

Exposure to diesel pollution may damage your heart

People exposed to particulate matter (PM) emitted mainly from diesel used in vehicles may be at greater risk of developing heart attack, heart failure and death, researchers warned.The findings showed that exposure to PM 2.5 from diesel can lead to systemic...

24-May-2017 London

High blood platelet levels 'strong predictor' of cancer : Study

Having a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, says a large-scale study.The study, published in the British Journal of General Practice, calls for general physicians to consider a diagnosis...

24-May-2017 London

Why dieting may not help you to lose weight

Looking to shed those extra kilos through dieting? You may be at a loss, as human bodies tend to compensate by sparing energy, limiting the number of calories that we burn and hence affect our weight loss regimen, researchers say.According to the study, a group...

24-May-2017 New York

Here's why eating chocolate may be good for your heart

Love to gorge on chocolates? According to a research, consuming up to six bars of chocolate a week may lower the risk of developing a common and dangerous type of irregular heartbeat linked with higher risk of stroke, heart failure, cognitive decline, dementia,...

24-May-2017 London

Your belly fat may up risk of cancer

Besides high body mass index (BMI), individuals with increased belly fat may be at a greater risk of developing cancer, including of the breast and bowel, especially in older adults, researchers have warned.Being overweight or obese is the single biggest preventable...

23-May-2017 Washington

Just one alcoholic drink a day ups breast cancer risk : Study

Drinking just one glass of wine or other alcoholic drink a day can increase breast cancer risk, reveals a major new report that analysed data on 12 million women.But vigorous exercise such as running or fast bicycling can help decreases the risk of both pre-...

22-May-2017 New York

'Light' cigarette use may up lung cancer risk

If you are a smoker using the so-called "light" cigarettes, for their lower levels of tar or nicotine, think twice. According to a study, you may be at an increased risk of developing a certain form of lung cancer that occurs deep in the lungs.Cigarettes...

21-May-2017 New York

Antibody that can help kill cancer cells emerges

Researchers have found that an antibody -- originally developed for studying the autoimmune condition multiple sclerosis -- can promote the immune system's ability to fight cancer and decreases tumour growth.In a study published in the journal Science Immunology,...

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