Updated on Feb 28, 2017 11:48:31

 

 

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27-Feb-2017 New Delhi

Removal of testicles can save men with fourth-stage prostate cancer

Initially, 62-year-old Ram Mathur did not feel any symptoms. When he started feeling some difficulty during urination, he chose to ignore it. The problem took an extreme turn when he started noticing swellings in the pelvic region, followed by blood in semen, decreased...

26-Feb-2017 London

Does reading maps make you nervous? Blame your genes

If the very thought of spatial and mathematical tasks, such as reading a map or solving a geometry problem, makes you nervous, it could be partly due to your genes, suggests a new research."Our results have important implications for finding specific genes...

26-Feb-2017 New York

Vitamin in milk could prevent pain caused by chemotherapy

A vitamin found in milk may be useful for treating or preventing nerve pain caused by chemotherapy drugs, says a study.For the study, the researchers tested the effect of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a form of vitamin B3, in female rats that were treated...

26-Feb-2017 New York

Neanderthal DNA influences our height, schizophrenia risk : Study

Although the last Neanderthal died tens of thousands years ago, their DNA sequences still influence how genes are turned on or off in modern humans, and their effects can contribute to traits such as height and susceptibility to schizophrenia or lupus, says a...

24-Feb-2017 New York

Spring coming sooner to Arctic due to climate change

Nature's clock is running fast in the Arctic, thanks to climate change. Due to diminishing sea ice cover, spring is coming sooner to some plant species in the low Arctic of Greenland, while other species are delaying their emergence amid warming winters, says...

24-Feb-2017 New York

Heel-to-ground foot makes us better fighters, slow runners

Standing with heels planted allows humans more swinging force when fighting, but the heel-down posture also makes us bad at fleeing, says a study.In contrast, many other species of mammals, including most primates, stand, walk and run with their heels elevated,...

24-Feb-2017 Sydney

Back pain ups risk of early death by 13%

Suffering from lower back pain? Be careful, back pain -- approximately affecting 700 million people worldwide -- is the leading cause of disability globally and may increase your risk of dying early by 13 per cent, researchers warn.The findings showed that compared...

23-Feb-2017 New York

Asthma drugs may prevent a deadly form of pneumonia

Two drugs that are used to treat asthma and allergies may offer a way to prevent a form of pneumonia that can kill up to 40 per cent of people who contract it, researchers have found.Influenza pneumonia results when a flu infection spreads to alveolar air...

21-Feb-2017 New York

Eating mercury rich fish may up neurological disease risk

Love to eat fish and other seafood? Be careful, as eating mercury-rich fish such as shark and swordfish may increase the risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) -- that takes away the ability of nerve cells to interact with the body's muscles...

19-Feb-2017 New Delhi

Your paunch may well hide cardiac risks

A typical young Indian male marries, and a few months later he develops a noticeable paunch. His mother and mother-in-law are pleased as punch, perceiving the paunch as a sign of his wellbeing of his being "looked after well" by his wife.But is it all...

18-Feb-2017 London

30-min walk boosts positivity in advanced cancer patients

For patients in the advanced stages of cancer, walking for at least 30 minutes thrice a week may boost a positive attitude towards their illness and improve their quality of life, new research claims.Despite growing evidence of significant health benefits...

18-Feb-2017 Toronto

Zero pollution may spike asthma in kids

Are you making the environment and water a bit too clean for your kids? Beware! You may be depriving them of the good microbes that may protect them against various illness, researchers warn.In a shocking revelation, Canadian researchers have found that...

18-Feb-2017 Toronto

Print solar cells at the cost of a newspaper!

Researchers have found a novel way to print perovskite solar cells easily and at a cost similar to bringing out a newspaper!A team, led by Hairen Tan from University of Toronto Engineering found that the solar cells manufactured with perovskite mineral could lead...

17-Feb-2017 New York

Consuming butter may double your risk of diabetes

Next time you order pizza with extra cheese or paranthas with dollops of butter, remember, you may be twice at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, researchers have warned.The findings in the study led by Marta Guasch-Ferre, researcher at Harvard T.H. Chan...

16-Feb-2017 New York

Excess weight in youth can cause stomach cancer later

An overweight youth in his early 20s is three times more at risk of developing cancer of either the oesophagus (food pipe) or upper stomach in adulthood, researchers have warned.The findings showed that those who are overweight at the age of 20 are nearly...

16-Feb-2017 New York

MRI scans can predict babies at risk of autism

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of babies at 6 and 12 months with older siblings with autism may correctly predict 80 per cent of those infants who may develop it at two years of age, researchers have found.Siblings of children diagnosed with autism have a higher...

16-Feb-2017 New York

Protein key to fighting common parasitic diseases identified

Researchers have identified a protein that shows promise as a biocontrol weapon against schistosomiasis, one of the worlds most prevalent parasitic diseases.Schistosomiasis is a potentially life-threatening illness that affects more than 250 million people annually...

15-Feb-2017 New York

Your belly fat may up diabetes, heart disease risk

If you are having an apple shaped body -- in which weight is deposited around the abdomen -- it may be high time to reduce the belly fat.A study warns that people who are genetically inclined to storing belly fat may be at an increased risk of developing...

13-Feb-2017 New York

Weight loss through surgery may cut diabetes risk

Losing weight through surgical approaches appears to reset chemical messages that fat cells send, substantially reducing people's risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, a study has found.Fat cells -- also known as adipocytes -- send messages to other cells in...

13-Feb-2017 New York

Anti-infection drug may cut infertility in cancer patients

A medication that is used to prevent infections in cancer patients may also help regenerate sperm stem cells and prevent them from infertility, researchers say.Cancer treatments like radiation and chemotherapy often kill sperm stem cells, making male reproduction...

13-Feb-2017 London

Anti-ageing hormone level linked with kidney disease

Deficiency in the levels of an anti-ageing hormone may predict the risk of development of kidney disease in patients with Type 1 diabetes, as well as become a target for new treatments, a study has showed.The finding showed that patients with diabetes suffering...

12-Feb-2017 New York

'Discuss social media boundaries with your partner'

Roses, cards and gifts are too clich├ęd gifts for Valentine's Day, so people should now discuss boundaries regarding social media with their significant other, says a researcherThe study conducted at Kansas State University noted that without a discussion, each...

12-Feb-2017 London

We like taking selfies but not looking at them

Although taking selfies is hugely popular, most people would prefer to see fewer selfies on social media, a study has found.Selfies are enormously popular on social media. According to Google statistics estimates, about 93 million selfies were taken per day in...

10-Feb-2017 Canberra

'Sexual orientation plays no part in mental health risk'

Homosexual and bisexual people are no more likely to be at risk of poor mental health compared to their straight counterparts, the results of an Australian study have revealed.Researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) studied around 5,000 adults over...

09-Feb-2017 New York

Ketamine may help prevent traumatic disorders

Administering a single dose of ketamine -- a drug commonly used as general anaesthetic or a rapid-acting antidepressant -- one week before a stressful event can act as a buffer against a heightened fear response and might prevent post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD),...

08-Feb-2017 New York

Why migraines are more common among women

Females are more vulnerable to certain stress-related and allergic diseases such as migraines because of distinct differences found in mast cells, a type of white blood cell that is part of the immune system, says a study.Mast cells are an important category...

08-Feb-2017 New York

Brisk walk helps you block work frustrations reaching home

Besides keeping you physically fit, a brisk walk or a long swim may be the key to preventing a bad day at the office from spilling over into the home, says a study."Research shows employees who are mistreated at work are likely to engage in similar behaviours...

07-Feb-2017 New York

Yoga can help relieve back pain

If you are suffering from chronic low back pain, yoga may offer some relief. Researchers have found that patients practicing it for three and six months are likely to experience improvements in back-related function and pain."We found that the practice...

07-Feb-2017 London

Eating nuts may cut risk of colon cancer

Consuming nuts such as hazelnuts, walnuts, almonds and pistachios may not only contribute to a healthy diet, but also slow down the growth of cancer cells and reduce the risk of colon cancer, researchers have found.The findings, led by researchers from University...

06-Feb-2017 New York

Childhood brain tumour can affect survivor's sex life later

Survivors of childhood brain tumours and any survivor who received cancer treatments that were especially toxic to the nervous system are less likely to have had intercourse, be in a relationship, or have children, new research has found.The findings, published...

05-Feb-2017 New York

World's tiniest hammer to improve treatments for brain injuries

Ever wondered what happens on the other side of our skulls when we hit our heads? Now, the world's first tiniest hammer being developed by the US researchers may help understand what happens when force is applied to brain cells, an advance that may help improve...

05-Feb-2017 Taipei

Pain relievers during flu may up heart attack risk

People who use pain killers for treating respiratory infections like common cold or flu may be at an increased risk of heart attack, researchers have warned.The findings showed that using the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) during an acute respiratory...

05-Feb-2017 New York

This robot mimics key flight mechanism of bats

A new self-contained robot that mimics the key flight mechanisms of bats has been developed by scientists.Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Caltech have developed Bat Bot (B2) with soft, articulated wings that can mimic...

03-Feb-2017 New York

Why smoking synthetic weed may not be safe

Smoking synthetic marijuana sold under names such as "K2" and "Spice", may not be a safe substitute to natural marijuana, but may lead to dangerous side-effects, including seizures, psychosis, dependence and death, researchers have warned.The synthetic cannabinoids...

03-Feb-2017 New York

New Zika vaccine protects animals with single dose

A new Zika vaccine tested in animals has the potential to provide long-term protection against the virus with a single dose, scientists say."We observed rapid and durable protective immunity without adverse events, and so we think this candidate vaccine...

03-Feb-2017 New York

Exercise may not help you lose weight : Study

If you thought spending hours in a gym every day would help you slim down, think again! A new study suggests that exercise may not prevent weight gain."Our study results indicate that physical activity may not protect you from gaining weight," said lead...

02-Feb-2017 London

Insomniac? You may be thrice at risk of asthma

Do you chronically spend sleepless nights, have poor sleep quality or face difficulties initiating or maintaining sleep? Beware, you may be more than thrice at risk of developing asthma in adulthood, researchers have warned.Asthma affects approximately...

02-Feb-2017 Bangkok

Malaria superbug lineage spreading fast in Asia : Study

A lineage of multidrug resistant P. falciparum malaria superbugs has widely spread and is now established in parts of Thailand, Laos and Cambodia, a study has warned.Noting that the further spread of these multidrug resistant parasites through India to...

01-Feb-2017 New York

This biomimetic tree can generate electricity

It is true that money does not grow on trees but electricity might someday, as scientists have developed a prototype biomimetic tree that mimics the branches and leaves of a cottonwood tree and generates electricity when its artificial leaves sway in the...

01-Feb-2017 New York

Now, a breath monitor to detect flu

Researchers have invented a hand-held breath monitor that can potentially detect flu virus and help prevent flu epidemics from spreading.The device could eventually be available in drug stores so that people can be diagnosed quickly and take advantage of medicines...

31-Jan-2017 London

High-altitude living cuts diabetes risk

A major risk factor for development of heart diseases, strokes and diabetes is lower in people who live at higher altitudes, says a new study that suggests that something as simple as the geographic area in which you live contribute to your risk of developing...

30-Jan-2017 London

Cheap breath test may detect stomach, oesophageal cancers

Scientists have developed a cheap and non-invasive test that can measure the levels of five chemicals in the breath to detect cancers of the oesophagus and stomach with 85 per cent accuracy.Together, stomach and oesophageal cancer account for around 1.4 million...

30-Jan-2017 London

Diabetes may be an early warning sign for pancreatic cancer

The onset of diabetes, or a rapid deterioration in existing diabetes that requires more aggressive treatment, could be a sign of early, hidden pancreatic cancer, warns a new study.The findings are based on an analysis linking nearly a million patients with...

29-Jan-2017 New York

Examining women's bones during menopause may cut fracture risk

Bone fragility, a serious condition affecting women as they age, should be identified as early as 30 years before they start fracturing, or during the phase of menopause, a study has suggested.Current identification for bone fragility takes place when the...

26-Jan-2017 New York

Mediterranean diet may help treat HIV, diabetes patients

Consuming a Mediterranean diet -- rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, high on healthy fats like olive oil and low in refined sugars and saturated fats -- may provide a good nutritious balance that can improve medication adherence and mental health...

26-Jan-2017 New York

Fitness, iron levels may boost grades in girls

Want to boost academic performance of your daughter? Maintaining a good exercise regimen along with intake of green leafy vegetables, nuts, cereals, seafood and poultry increases iron levels which may help her improve grade levels, a study has shown.
The...

26-Jan-2017 Toronto

Conditions in womb can affect brain development in teenage

A babys' placement in the womb and access to nutrition can affect his or her brain later in adolescence, a study has found.The findings showed that the utero environment was linked to the development of the cortex -- a part of the brain that regulates...

26-Jan-2017 London

Anxiety, depression may up death risk from some cancers

Higher levels of psychological distress such as anxiety and depression may be associated with an increased risk of death from certain cancers, a study has found.The results show that compared with people in the least distressed group, death rates in the most...

25-Jan-2017 New York

Impulsive? You may be at risk of obesity

 If you are impulsive in making decisions, chances are that you may become obese, say researchers who found a link between having an impulsive personality and a high body mass index (BMI).The findings demonstrate that having an impulsive personality -- the...

22-Jan-2017 New York

Brain stimulation used like a scalpel can improve memory

Non-invasive brain stimulations can work like a scalpel to improve the precise memory of a human and can also be used as a treatment for those who have memory problem because of brain injury, a new study has found.Precise memory is critical for knowing details such...

19-Jan-2017 New York

Gestational diabetes may up postpartum depression risk

Gestational diabetes is likely to raise the risk of depression after childbirth in first-time mothers, a study has found.Gestational diabetes is a form of high blood sugar affecting pregnant women.The findings showed that women with a history of depression are more...

19-Jan-2017 New York

Heartbeat to soon unlock electronic health records

What if your heartbeat can safeguard your electronic health records in the near future? Researchers from Binghamton University believe so and have used the heart's electrical pattern as an encryption key for electronic records.The cost and complexity of traditional...

18-Jan-2017 Washington

A third of adults with asthma may not have it

As many as one third of adults diagnosed with asthma may not actually have the disease, according to a Canadian study.The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Tuesday, looked at 613 randomly selected patients from 10 Canadian...

15-Jan-2017 New York

Exercise may boost brain activity, memory in elderly

Maintaining high levels of fitness through physical activity such as walking, jogging, swimming, or dancing may increase brain function and boost memory -- the hallmark impairments in Alzheimer's disease - in older adults, researchers say.The finding showed that...

15-Jan-2017 London

Changing location may help bring changes in yourself

Want to make your New Year resolution successful? Try relocating, as it may help to overcome the things one wants to change in themselves, a new study says.The study showed that the time for successful habit change is not based on the calendar, but on big...

15-Jan-2017 London

Sulphuric acid clouds caused darkness, cold, killing dinosaurs

Millions of years ago, tiny droplets of sulphuric acid formed high up in the air after an asteroid hit the Earth, making it dark and cold for several years and resulted in the extinction of dinosaurs from the planet, a study has revealed.The study conducted by...

15-Jan-2017 New York

20-minute exercise is all you need to be fit

If you can spare 20 minutes everyday for moderate exercise, it will stimulate your immune system and make you less prone to diseases like arthritis and fibromyalgia, a new research has found.Scientists at the University of California (UC) in San Diego found...

14-Jan-2017 London

Don't think your kids are obese, else they gain weight

If you think that your child is overweight, chances are that he or she may gain more weight as they grow up.According to a new study, parents' perception of their children as overweight could have unintended negative consequences on their children's health.Children...

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