Updated on Apr 29, 2017 02:23:05

 

 

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26-Apr-2017 New York

Eating less salt may not lower your BP, says study

Contrary to popular belief, consuming less sodium may not lead to lower blood pressure in the long term, show results of a new study that followed more than 2,600 men and women for 16 years."We saw no evidence that a diet lower in sodium had any long-term beneficial...

24-Apr-2017 New York

High BP drug could treat skin cancer

Researchers have discovered by accident cancer-fighting properties in a drug typically used to treat high blood pressure.The drug carvedilol can protect against the sun-induced cell damage that leads to skin cancer, the findings showed."What began as an experimental...

22-Apr-2017 London

Researchers discover new cause of high blood pressure

Researchers have discovered a new cause of high blood pressure which could lead to major changes in managing the disease.In a study published in the journal JCI Insight, the researchers named the new cause as Connshing syndrome which is linked to the overproduction...

22-Apr-2017 New York

Liver carcinogen traced to sunflower seeds

Researchers have shown that sunflower seeds are frequently contaminated with a toxin which has the potential to cause live cancer.In the study published in the journal PLoS ONE, the team of scientists documented frequent occurrence of aflatoxin -- a toxin produced...

19-Apr-2017 New York

Air pollution ups risk of chronic sinus problems

People living in places like New Delhi or Beijing may be at greater risk of developing chronic sinus problems due to high levels of air polution in these cities, say researchers.In the study, published in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular...

18-Apr-2017 New York

Cannabis compound could treat itching, other skin diseases

Anti-inflammatory properties in a cannabis compound could help treat itching and a wide-range of other skin diseases, say researchers.The new study, published online in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, summarises the current literature on the subject...

15-Apr-2017 New York

Facebook disrupts spam operations

Days after Facebook suspended 30,000 fake accounts in France, the social networking giant has disrupted spam operations it had been combating for six months.In a post, Facebook's Technical Programme Manager Shabnam Shaik said the spam was made up of inauthentic...

15-Apr-2017 New York

Combination therapy may boost survival in brain cancer patients

A combination of vaccine and chemotherapy sessions may help improve both progression-free survival and overall survival rates for patients suffering from glioblastoma -- a malignant tumour affecting the brain or spine, researchers say.In a clinical trial,...

15-Apr-2017 New York

New 3D-printed digital patch may heal damaged heart tissue

US scientists have created a revolutionary digital three dimensional (3D) bio-printed patch that can help heal scarred heart tissue in patients after a heart attack.During a heart attack, a person loses blood flow to the heart muscle, causing the cells...

14-Apr-2017 New York

Scientists develop CRISPR-based diagnostic system

Researchers have developed a diagnostic platform based on the gene editing tool CRISPR which could one day be used to respond to viral and bacterial outbreaks, monitor antibiotic resistance, and detect cancer.The researchers adapted a CRISPR protein that targets...

13-Apr-2017 Toronto

Omega-6 fats may make girls lazy, up diabetes risk

Challenging the common perception, researchers led by one of Indian origin, have found that Omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) -- referred to as the "healthy fats" -- can lead to lazy behaviour, especially in women, as well as contribute to diabetes.The...

13-Apr-2017 New York

Apple team is developing sensors to monitor diabetes

A secret team of biomedical engineers at Apple is working on an initiative to develop sensors that can non-invasively and continuously monitor blood sugar levels to better treat diabetes.According to a report by CNBC on Wednesday, the team is working at...

13-Apr-2017 New York

Hot flashes could predict risk of heart disease

Hot flashes in women at the pre-menopausal stages may signal emerging vascular dysfunction that can lead to heart disease, a study has shown.Hot flashes -- a sudden feeling of feverish heat, typically as a symptom of the menopause -- have already been shown...

10-Apr-2017 London

Common drugs may up pneumonia risk in Alzheimer's patients

Commonly used sedatives called benzodiazepines are associated with an increased risk of pneumonia when used in people with Alzheimer disease, according to a study.Dementia, of which 60-70 per cent of cases are Alzheimer disease, is a risk factor for pneumonia,...

10-Apr-2017 New York

Why exercise on empty stomach may be better for your health

If you have been wondering whether it is better to eat or fast before a workout, researchers now have an answer. A new study has found that exercise on empty stomach is better for your health in the long term.The study analysed effects of eating versus...

10-Apr-2017 New York

Obesity may influence blood tests for rheumatoid arthritis

Being obese or overweight may influence the blood tests used to assess the levels of inflammation for rheumatoid arthritis in women, researchers have found.Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that affects joint linings, causing painful...

09-Apr-2017 London

Asthma drug found promising in skin disorder treatment

Patients who develop itchy wheals in response to cold or friction, benefit from treatment with omalizumab, a drug normally used to treat asthma, a new research has found.The drug's active substance is highly effective against different types of inducible urticaria,...

09-Apr-2017 New York

Your kid's hands maybe full of harmful nicotine

If you are a smoker, chances are that your children may be exposed to significant levels of nicotine on their hands just by coming into contact with items or surfaces contaminated with tobacco smoke residues, researchers have found.The findings showed that...

07-Apr-2017 New York

Kidney patients' urine may predict death risk

Patients with chronic kidney disease who have low levels of ammonium in their urine may be at high risk of the disease progression or death, researchers have warned.A study by US researchers showed that patients with the lowest levels of urine ammonium excretion...

06-Apr-2017 New York

Poor sleep ups risk of memory loss in elderly

Unmet sleep needs of the elderly elevate their risk of memory loss and a wide range of mental and physical disorders, says a study,The researchers, however, warned that the pills designed to help us doze off are a poor substitute for the natural sleep cycles...

06-Apr-2017 London

Smoking causes one in 10 deaths worldwide : Study

Smoking causes one in 10 deaths worldwide, half of them in just four countries -- China, India, the US and Russia, a new study revealed on Thursday.The Global Burden of Diseases Report was based on smoking habits in 195 countries and territories between 1990...

06-Apr-2017 New York

Fruits and vegetables may help lower BP

Eating potassium-rich foods like sweet potatoes, avocados, spinach, beans, bananas -- and even drinking coffee -- could be key to lowering blood pressure, new research suggests."Decreasing sodium intake is a well-established way to lower blood pressure, but...

06-Apr-2017 London

Eating Marmite may be good for your brain : Study

Consuming Marmite -- a tangy British spread -- daily may be good for the brain, as it has been found to increase a chemical messenger associated with healthy brain function, a study has showed.In the study, published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, participants...

06-Apr-2017 Washington

Muslim births to overtake Christian births in two decades : Study

The number of babies born to Muslim women worldwide will exceed the number of Christian births within the next 20 years, a new study said.The report, by non-profit Pew Research Center, also predicts that Islam -- already the world's fastest-growing religion...

05-Apr-2017 London

Delaying womens' marriages may boost kid's well being

Reducing child marriages and delaying the marriage of younger women in India may have significant results in improving child health and educational outcomes, a study has found.The research revealed that the children of women who got married later were more likely...

03-Apr-2017 New York

Common plastic chemical may increase breast cancer risk

An endocrine-disrupting chemical commonly found in polycarbonate hard plastics, currency bills and thermal paper receipts may potentially interfere with the body's hormones to increase the aggressiveness of breast cancer, a new study has showed.Bisphenol...

03-Apr-2017 New York

New gene-based blood tests can detect skin cancers

Researchers have found that two new gene-based blood tests can reliably detect previously unidentifiable forms of one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer.Having quick and accurate monitoring tools for all types of metastatic melanoma, the medical term for...

02-Apr-2017 Bangkok

Being a night owl may up your risk of depression

If you are diabetic and prefer to go to bed late, you may be at an increased risk of developing depression, researchers say.According to a study, people with Type 2 diabetes who are "night owls" and prefer the evening for activity report having more symptoms...

02-Apr-2017 New York

Your chronic lack of sleep may lead to bone loss

A shift-based job or frequent travelling that causes jet lag poses continuous restriction on good sleep as well as disruptions in the internal body clock, and might be an unrecognised factor for bone loss in young men, researchers say.The finding showed...

02-Apr-2017 London

Higher thyroid hormone levels may up heart disease risk

People with higher levels of thyroid hormones may be more likely to develop cardiovascular conditions such as heart attacks, strokes, new research showed.Atherosclerosis -- hardening and narrowing of the arteries -- silently and slowly blocks arteries, putting...

31-Mar-2017 London

Eating legumes may reduce your risk of diabetes

A higher consumption of legumes -- such as lentils, chickpeas, beans and peas -- has the potential to lower the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by 35 per cent, researchers say.Legumes are a food group rich in B vitamins, contain different beneficial...

30-Mar-2017 New York

Teeth loss in postmenopausal women may up death risk

Post-menopausal women who suffer from gum disease and tooth loss may be at a higher risk of death, according to a study.Periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory disease of the gum and connective tissue surrounding the teeth, leads to loss of one's teeth, known as...

29-Mar-2017 New Delhi

Retailers eye IoT, AI and automation to boost growth : Study

Retailers in the Asia-Pacific region are fast adopting Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence and automation strategies to boost growth, a new study has said.Retailer are moving from brick-and-mortar stores to online channels, which would lead to synergies...

29-Mar-2017 New York

Running a marathon may cause kidney injury, research shows

Gearing up for a marathon race? Beware, the physical stress caused by running may cause kidney injury, researchers, led by one of Indian-origin, have warned.In the study, 82 per cent of the runners had Stage 1 Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) soon after the race. AKI...

29-Mar-2017 New York

We learn to understand others after age 4

Researchers have found why at around the age of four children suddenly do what three-year-olds are unable to do -- put themselves in someone else's shoes.This enormous developmental step occurs as a critical fibre connection in the brain matures, according to a...

29-Mar-2017 New York

Pokemon GO helping parents bond with kids : Study

Parents who regularly play "Pokemon GO" with their children report a number of side benefits including increased exercise, more time spent outdoors and opportunities for family bonding, says a study.Pokemon GO is a location-based augmented reality game in which...

29-Mar-2017 New York

Childhood exposure to lead may lower IQ

Higher exposure of lead in childhood may affect brain health and disrupt cognitive development, researchers say.Lead is a powerful neurotoxin that can accumulate in a child's bloodstream, then settle in the bones, teeth and soft tissues and build up in the...

28-Mar-2017 New York

New technique could lead to earlier diagnosis of liver cancer

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a way to determine, by sequencing DNA of liver cells, whether those cells have been exposed to a potent carcinogen, thereby paving the way for earlier diagnosis of the deadly disease.In...

28-Mar-2017 Washington

New blood test identifies TB infections within hours

US researchers said they have successfully developed a blood test that can rapidly diagnose and quantitate the severity of active tuberculosis (TB) cases, an important advance against the major global health threat, a media report said."In the current frontlines...

26-Mar-2017 London

Stem cell therapy restores sexual function in impotent men

Stem cell therapy can restore sufficient erectile function to allow previously impotent men to have spontaneous intercourse, show results of an early clinical trial."What we have done establishes that this technique can lead to men recovering a spontaneous...

26-Mar-2017 Kolkata

'Repurposing' malaria drug to treat castrate-resistant prostate cancer

Tapping into the trend of repurposing old approved drugs to treat totally different diseases -- a strategy that led to the development of Viagra, researchers at IIT-Kanpur have shown how a malaria drug can be used to tackle drug resistance in metastatic prostate...

25-Mar-2017 New York

10 minutes of vigorous exercise will boost kids' heart health

Encouraging your children to engage in as little as 10 minutes a day in high-intensity physical activity could help them reduce their risk of developing heart problems and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, researchers say.The findings showed that replacing light-intensity...

25-Mar-2017 Toronto

Childhood brain tumour survivor's high body fat ups stroke risk

Survivors of childhood brain tumours have more body fat, increasing their risk of stroke, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and early death, research has shown.The study showed that although survivors of childhood brain tumours -- the second most common type of cancers...

20-Mar-2017 Toronto

Your high BP might just be a case of misdiagnosis

Nearly 20 per cent of people receiving treatment for hypertension do not actually have a problem, but they are often misdiagnosed as a result of doctors using manual devices to measure blood pressure, a study has showed."About 20 per cent of people receiving...

19-Mar-2017 New York

Human skull hole evolved with walking on two legs

The evolution of human skull took place along with two-legged walking, researchers have confirmed.Compared with other primates, the large hole at the base of the human skull where the spinal cord passes through, known as the foramen magnum, is shifted forward.While...

19-Mar-2017 New York

Harder calcium deposits may predict heart attack risk

People with proportionately higher quantities of harder calcified plaque best predicted risk of heart attacks, while soft plaque did not, representing a potential paradigm shift, researchers said.The study may be a "game-changer" for determining who is at risk...

19-Mar-2017 Beijing

Diabetes drug may help treat breast cancer

Chinese researchers have found that a drug used to treat diabetes could be effective against a form of breast cancer.Over 70,000 people die from breast cancer in China every year, according to the national cancer centre.Triple-negative breast cancer is particularly...

19-Mar-2017 New York

Your expertise may raise risk of mistakes when interrupted

If you are highly skilled at your workplace, chances are that your expertise can prove to be a risk factor for procedural errors in environments with a high incidence of task interruption, researchers say.The study conducted by researchers in the Michigan...

18-Mar-2017 New York

Sleep apnea in kids may affect mental skills, behaviour

Children with chronically disrupted sleep are likely to have defects in their brain cells that are associated with mental skills, mood and behaviour, researchers have warned.Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disturbance which affects up to five per cent...

18-Mar-2017 New York

Evolocumab, added to statins may help lower cholesterol

A new class of cholesterol-lowering drug, when added to statin therapy could cut cholesterol levels by almost 60 per cent on average in patients with an underlying risk of cardiovascular disease such as heart atack or stroke, a study has found.In the study,...

18-Mar-2017 Sydney

Maternal Vitamin D levels may prevent autism in kids

Intake of Vitamin D supplements during the first trimester of pregnancy is likely to prevent the development of autism traits in children, researchers found in a study on mice.Autism -- or autism spectrum disorder -- describes lifelong developmental disabilities...

16-Mar-2017 New York

Whole-body vibration may help combat obesity, diabetes

Indulging in a less strenuous form of exercise known as whole-body vibration could mimic the muscle and bone health benefits of regular exercise and help combat obesity and diabetes, according to a new study.Whole-body vibration consists of a person sitting, standing...

16-Mar-2017 Toronto

Failed IVF treatment may up heart disease risk

Women who undergo fertility therapy, but do not get pregnant, may be at a higher risk of developing long-term cardiovascular disease, compared to women who become pregnant, a new study has found.According to researchers, the drugs used for the fertility treatments...

14-Mar-2017 New York

New hormone test may distinguish schizophrenia, depression

US researchers have developed a new hormone-based test that can better distinguish between the symptoms of depression and schizophrenia.Depression is thought to affect over 300 million people worldwide and schizophrenia affects as many as 51 million people....

14-Mar-2017 London

MRI scans may help spot HIV in the brain

Despite effective drug treatment, HIV may still persist in the brain and lead to cognitive problems. But, tracking the changes to the brain's white matter using MRI scans can help spot the deadly virus, say researchers including one of Indian-origin.According...

14-Mar-2017 London

Having children may increase your lifespan

Although parenthood may have its share of woes, it could also hold the key to long life, particularly in older age, when health and capacity may start to decline, finds a new study.The findings suggested that the risks of death were lower among those who had...

14-Mar-2017 Washington

Saturn's moon Enceladus may have water closer to surface

Saturn moon Enceladus's hidden sea might be closer to the surface than previously thought, suggests a new study that found the south polar region of the moon to be warmer than expected just a few feet below its icy surface.The new study, based on data collected...

12-Mar-2017 New York

Severe hypoglycemia may up death risk in diabetics

Even a single episode of severe hypoglycemic condition -- having low blood glucose levels -- may be associated with nearly double the risk of cardiovascular disease or death in older adults with Type 2 diabetes, a study has found.Diabetes is a condition marked...

12-Mar-2017 New York

Childhood bullying may up heart disease, diabetes risk

Being bullied during childhood might have lifelong health effects related to chronic stress exposure, including an increased risk for heart disease and diabetes in adulthood, a study has showed.Bullying -- a classic form of chronic social stress -- could have...

11-Mar-2017 New York

Rapid BP drop in middle age linked to dementia later

Middle-aged people who experience rapid drop in blood pressure often causing dizziness may be at an increased risk of developing cognitive decline and dementia 20 years later, a study said.The findings suggest that these temporary episodes -- known as orthostatic...

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