Updated on Jun 24, 2017 15:54:18

 

 

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22-Jun-2017 London

Sex can boost brain power in older adults

Staying busy in your bedroom even after age 50 could be good for your brain as researchers have found that older adults who have sex more frequently do better in brain function tests.The researchers found that those who engaged in more regular sexual activity...

22-Jun-2017 London

Breastfeeding may cut mother's heart attack risk

Breastfeeding may reduce a mother's heart attack and stroke risk later in life, according to new research.The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, showed that women who breastfed their babies had about a 10 percent lower risk of developing...

19-Jun-2017 London

New 3-in-1 blood test to aid precision prostate cancer therapy

Opening the door to precision medicine for prostate cancer, researchers have developed a three-in-one blood test that could tell which men would benefit from a class of new drugs, detect early signs of resistance and monitor cancer's evolution over time.The...

19-Jun-2017 Mumbai

85% diabetics see amputations in their lifetime

Eighty-five per cent of diabetics see amputations in their lifetime due to lack of appropriate treatment, data released during a national conference on diabetics here has revealed.Currently 15 per cent of of India's diabetic population suffers from ulcers in their...

18-Jun-2017 London

Researchers develop rapid blood test for malaria diagnosis

Researchers have developed an automated rapid blood test that could make malaria diagnosis faster and more reliable than it is now.The new method enables the diagnosis of the disease with 97 per cent accuracy, Technical University of Munich (TUM) said in a statement.According...

17-Jun-2017 London

Childhood passive smoking may up arthritis risk later

Exposure to passive smoking in childhood significantly increased the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in adult smokers, a study has showed.Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting many joints, including those in the hands and feet.The...

13-Jun-2017 New York

What puts farmers at higher risk of suicide

Besides financial issues, which push many farmers to commit suicide especially during economic crises or periods of extreme weather, several other factors may drive farmers to take the extreme step, says a study."Occupational factors such as poor access to quality...

13-Jun-2017 New York

Vitamin A deficiency may increase TB risk

People with low levels of vitamin A living with individuals sick with tuberculosis (TB) may be 10 times more likely to develop the disease than people with high levels of the nutrient, new research has found.The findings suggests that vitamin A supplementation...

13-Jun-2017 Sydney

Diabetes drug may cut heart, kidney disease risk

A drug that lowers blood sugar levels for people with Type 2 diabetes may also significantly help reduce the risk of both cardiovascular and kidney disease, researchers claimed.Type 2 diabetes, which affects around 450 million people worldwide, also increases...

13-Jun-2017 London

Can gum disease delay pregnancy?

A common bacterium associated with gum disease may delay conception in young women, warns a new study."Our results encourage young women of fertile age to take care of their oral health and attend periodontal evaluations regularly," said one of the researchers...

11-Jun-2017 New York

Finger-stick blood test may not help type 2 diabetes treatment

New research has revealed that checking blood sugar with a finger-stick may not help type 2 diabetes patients who do not use insulin.Type 2 diabetes is an epidemic afflicting one in 11 people in the US and for those treated with insulin, checking blood sugar...

08-Jun-2017 Toronto

Eating red onions may help combat cancer

Dark red onions, known as the richest source of dietary flavonoids, may help fight off cancer of the colon and breast, a researcher has suggested.We found that onions are excellent at killing cancer cells," said Abdulmonem Murayyan, doctoral student at the...

07-Jun-2017 New York

An egg a day may spurt growth in kids

Eating an egg a day can significantly increase growth and reduce stunting by 47 per cent in young children, finds a study."Eggs can be affordable and easily accessible. It can be a good source of nutrients for growth and development in young children and have...

07-Jun-2017 Melbourne

Scientists begin trial of radiation injections for cancers

Australian scientists began a clinical trial of injecting radiotherapy to combat aggressive breast cancer, media reported on Wednesday.Women suffering from the most aggressive types of breast cancer will undergo treatment combining radiation with immunotherapy...

06-Jun-2017 London

Researchers find new potential target for cancer treatment

Paving the way for developing highly specific cancer drugs with fewer side-effects, researchers have discovered that cancer cells and normal cells use different 'gene switches' in order to regulate the expression of genes that control growth."Since we find...

05-Jun-2017 New York

Even mild sleep apnoea may up hypertension, diabetes risk

Young and middle-aged adults suffering from mild-to-moderate obstructive sleep apnoea with symptoms such as snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness, may be at an increased risk of developing hypertension and diabetes, researchers say.Obstructive sleep apnoea...

02-Jun-2017 New York

Baby teeth with heavy metals may predict autism risk

Baby teeth from children with autism contain more toxic lead and less of essential nutrients such as zinc and manganese, compared to teeth from children without autism, finds a study led by an Indian-origin researcher.The study showed that children with autism...

01-Jun-2017 London

Internet withdrawal may increase heart rate, BP

Just as a drug addict may face withdrawal symptoms, people who use the internet a lot may experience significant physiological changes such as increased heart rate and blood pressure when they go offline, scientists have found."We have known for some time...

31-May-2017 New York

How bacteria in your body may promote diabetes

While a large waistline and high blood sugar levels are known risk factors for diabetes, researchers have now found that having bacteria that penetrate the mucus lining of the colon may promote metabolic disease, particularly Type-2 diabetes.Metabolic syndrome,...

29-May-2017 New York

Marijuana use may increase gum disease risk

Frequent recreational use of cannabis -- including marijuana, hashish, and hash oil -- increases the risk of gum disease, says a study."It is well known that frequent tobacco use can increase the risk of periodontal disease, but it was surprising to see that...

29-May-2017 New York

Sugary diet may up risk of cancer : Study

Love to eat a sugar rich diet? Beware, it may fuel various forms of cancer by giving them the much needed energy to multiply, researchers say.The researchers found that one type of cancer called as squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) -- found in lung, head and...

26-May-2017 London

Exposure to diesel pollution may damage your heart

People exposed to particulate matter (PM) emitted mainly from diesel used in vehicles may be at greater risk of developing heart attack, heart failure and death, researchers warned.The findings showed that exposure to PM 2.5 from diesel can lead to systemic...

24-May-2017 London

High blood platelet levels 'strong predictor' of cancer : Study

Having a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, says a large-scale study.The study, published in the British Journal of General Practice, calls for general physicians to consider a diagnosis...

24-May-2017 London

Why dieting may not help you to lose weight

Looking to shed those extra kilos through dieting? You may be at a loss, as human bodies tend to compensate by sparing energy, limiting the number of calories that we burn and hence affect our weight loss regimen, researchers say.According to the study, a group...

24-May-2017 New York

Here's why eating chocolate may be good for your heart

Love to gorge on chocolates? According to a research, consuming up to six bars of chocolate a week may lower the risk of developing a common and dangerous type of irregular heartbeat linked with higher risk of stroke, heart failure, cognitive decline, dementia,...

24-May-2017 London

Your belly fat may up risk of cancer

Besides high body mass index (BMI), individuals with increased belly fat may be at a greater risk of developing cancer, including of the breast and bowel, especially in older adults, researchers have warned.Being overweight or obese is the single biggest preventable...

23-May-2017 Washington

Just one alcoholic drink a day ups breast cancer risk : Study

Drinking just one glass of wine or other alcoholic drink a day can increase breast cancer risk, reveals a major new report that analysed data on 12 million women.But vigorous exercise such as running or fast bicycling can help decreases the risk of both pre-...

22-May-2017 New York

'Light' cigarette use may up lung cancer risk

If you are a smoker using the so-called "light" cigarettes, for their lower levels of tar or nicotine, think twice. According to a study, you may be at an increased risk of developing a certain form of lung cancer that occurs deep in the lungs.Cigarettes...

21-May-2017 New York

Antibody that can help kill cancer cells emerges

Researchers have found that an antibody -- originally developed for studying the autoimmune condition multiple sclerosis -- can promote the immune system's ability to fight cancer and decreases tumour growth.In a study published in the journal Science Immunology,...

20-May-2017 London

Overweight boys at high risk of colon cancer later

Is your son overweight? Beware, he may be at an increased greater risk of developing colon (bowel) cancer in adulthood as compared to his slimmer friends, researchers have warned.A cancer of the colon or rectum, located at the digestive tract's lower end...

19-May-2017 New York

Eating nuts may cut risk of colon cancer recurrence by half

Researchers have found that eating tree nuts which include almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, cashews, and pecans, among others, is associated with significant reduced risk of colon cancer recurrence.The observational study of 826 patients with stage III colon cancer...

17-May-2017 London

Just 2 sedentary weeks may up diabetes, heart disease

Young adults who take a hiatus from exercise for just two weeks may be at an increased risk of reducing muscle mass, metabolic health, that may accelerate the development of chronic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, a study has found.The findings...

16-May-2017 Sydney

Suffering from pneumonia? You may be at risk of heart attack

A spell of respiratory infections such as pneumonia, influenza and bronchitis may increase your risk of suffering a heart attack by 17 times, a research has showed.The findings showed that the increased risk is not necessarily just at the beginning of...

14-May-2017 London

A glass of beetroot juice could lower BP, heart attack risk

A glass of beetroot juice -- a source of dietary nitrate -- could dramatically lower as well as reduce heart attack risk, a study has revealed.Dietary nitrate is a compound that dilates blood vessels to decrease blood pressure, a leading factor for developing...

12-May-2017 London

How depression may increase heart disease risk

People with severe mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression, have a 53 per cent higher risk for having cardiovascular disease than individuals without mental illness, says a large study of more than 3.2 million people.The...

10-May-2017 Toronto

Daily painkiller use ups heart attack risk

Regular use of commonly prescribed painkillers can increase the risk of a heart attack as early as in the first week of use and especially within the first month of taking high doses, suggests a study.The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)...

08-May-2017 New York

Beware! Cotton buds may do more harm than good

Using cotton buds to clean ears may seem harmless, but they have the potential to cause minor to severe injury to the ear, researchers have warned."The two biggest misconceptions I hear as an otolaryngologist are that the ear canals need to be cleaned in the...

07-May-2017 Vienna

Chest irradiation can cause heart disease decades later

Hodgkin lymphoma patients who receive high dose irradiation as part of their treatment at an early age suffer from severe coronary artery disease (CAD) decades later, a research said on Sunday.Hodgkin's lymphoma is a type of lymphoma -- cancer of a part of the...

07-May-2017 New York

Non-surgical weight-loss treatment safe, effective

Those individuals who cannot undergo weight-loss surgery can successfully lose their weight from non-surgical treatments like endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG), new research has found.Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty reduces the stomach size using an endoscopic...

06-May-2017 London

Why night shifts may be bad for your liver

Working at night may be bad for your liver as researchers have discovered that this organ adapts to the cycles of feeding and fasting, and the alternation of day and night within 24 hours.The researchers showed in mice that the size of the liver increases by...

02-May-2017 London

Good relationships linked to lower dementia risk

Having a reliable, approachable and understanding relationship with spouse or partner, children and other immediate family members may put older adults at reduced risk of developing dementia, says a study.Conversely, negative social support characterised by...

02-May-2017 New York

Obese? Weight loss may prevent knee joint degeneration

The more weight obese and overweight individuals lose, the better it could be for their knee joints, new research suggests.Being overweight or obese can place extra pressure on joints and cartilage, causing them to wear away. In addition, people with more...

02-May-2017 London

High BP in childhood may worsen memory later

Children who suffer high blood pressure, cholesterol are likely to have poor cognitive skills such as memory and learning in middle age, a study has found."While it is well known that high blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking are associated with poor cognitive...

01-May-2017 London

Blood group may predict risk of heart attack

People having a non-O blood group -- A, B, AB -- may be at 9 per cent higher risk of suffering a heart attack and overall cardiovascular mortality compared to those with O-blood group, a research has showed.The findings revealed that the higher risk may be...

30-Apr-2017 New York

Is there a positive side to worrying?

A new study by a psychology professor at the University of California - Riverside shows that there is a positive side to worrying."Worry -- it does a body good. And, the mind as well," said Kate Sweeny in the paper published in Social and Personality Psychology...

26-Apr-2017 New York

Eating less salt may not lower your BP, says study

Contrary to popular belief, consuming less sodium may not lead to lower blood pressure in the long term, show results of a new study that followed more than 2,600 men and women for 16 years."We saw no evidence that a diet lower in sodium had any long-term beneficial...

24-Apr-2017 New York

High BP drug could treat skin cancer

Researchers have discovered by accident cancer-fighting properties in a drug typically used to treat high blood pressure.The drug carvedilol can protect against the sun-induced cell damage that leads to skin cancer, the findings showed."What began as an experimental...

22-Apr-2017 London

Researchers discover new cause of high blood pressure

Researchers have discovered a new cause of high blood pressure which could lead to major changes in managing the disease.In a study published in the journal JCI Insight, the researchers named the new cause as Connshing syndrome which is linked to the overproduction...

22-Apr-2017 New York

Liver carcinogen traced to sunflower seeds

Researchers have shown that sunflower seeds are frequently contaminated with a toxin which has the potential to cause live cancer.In the study published in the journal PLoS ONE, the team of scientists documented frequent occurrence of aflatoxin -- a toxin produced...

19-Apr-2017 New York

Air pollution ups risk of chronic sinus problems

People living in places like New Delhi or Beijing may be at greater risk of developing chronic sinus problems due to high levels of air polution in these cities, say researchers.In the study, published in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular...

18-Apr-2017 New York

Cannabis compound could treat itching, other skin diseases

Anti-inflammatory properties in a cannabis compound could help treat itching and a wide-range of other skin diseases, say researchers.The new study, published online in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, summarises the current literature on the subject...

15-Apr-2017 New York

Facebook disrupts spam operations

Days after Facebook suspended 30,000 fake accounts in France, the social networking giant has disrupted spam operations it had been combating for six months.In a post, Facebook's Technical Programme Manager Shabnam Shaik said the spam was made up of inauthentic...

15-Apr-2017 New York

Combination therapy may boost survival in brain cancer patients

A combination of vaccine and chemotherapy sessions may help improve both progression-free survival and overall survival rates for patients suffering from glioblastoma -- a malignant tumour affecting the brain or spine, researchers say.In a clinical trial,...

15-Apr-2017 New York

New 3D-printed digital patch may heal damaged heart tissue

US scientists have created a revolutionary digital three dimensional (3D) bio-printed patch that can help heal scarred heart tissue in patients after a heart attack.During a heart attack, a person loses blood flow to the heart muscle, causing the cells...

14-Apr-2017 New York

Scientists develop CRISPR-based diagnostic system

Researchers have developed a diagnostic platform based on the gene editing tool CRISPR which could one day be used to respond to viral and bacterial outbreaks, monitor antibiotic resistance, and detect cancer.The researchers adapted a CRISPR protein that targets...

13-Apr-2017 Toronto

Omega-6 fats may make girls lazy, up diabetes risk

Challenging the common perception, researchers led by one of Indian origin, have found that Omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) -- referred to as the "healthy fats" -- can lead to lazy behaviour, especially in women, as well as contribute to diabetes.The...

13-Apr-2017 New York

Apple team is developing sensors to monitor diabetes

A secret team of biomedical engineers at Apple is working on an initiative to develop sensors that can non-invasively and continuously monitor blood sugar levels to better treat diabetes.According to a report by CNBC on Wednesday, the team is working at...

13-Apr-2017 New York

Hot flashes could predict risk of heart disease

Hot flashes in women at the pre-menopausal stages may signal emerging vascular dysfunction that can lead to heart disease, a study has shown.Hot flashes -- a sudden feeling of feverish heat, typically as a symptom of the menopause -- have already been shown...

10-Apr-2017 London

Common drugs may up pneumonia risk in Alzheimer's patients

Commonly used sedatives called benzodiazepines are associated with an increased risk of pneumonia when used in people with Alzheimer disease, according to a study.Dementia, of which 60-70 per cent of cases are Alzheimer disease, is a risk factor for pneumonia,...

10-Apr-2017 New York

Why exercise on empty stomach may be better for your health

If you have been wondering whether it is better to eat or fast before a workout, researchers now have an answer. A new study has found that exercise on empty stomach is better for your health in the long term.The study analysed effects of eating versus...

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