Updated on Apr 20, 2018 22:54:23

 

 

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11-Apr-2018 New York

Severe menopausal symptoms may spike risk of heart disease

Menopause, associated with frequent and severe symptoms such as sleep disturbance, hot flashes and depression, may  increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), a study says.The study found that menopause transition is marked with a number...

11-Apr-2018 London

Good cholesterol may up gastro, pneumonia risk

While bad cholesterol has been blamed for increasing risk of heart disease, variations in the good cholesterol levels may also  lead to infectious diseases such as gastroenteritis or pneumonia, according to a study.Individuals with very low high-density...

11-Apr-2018 London

Novel skin patch to monitor diabetes developed

Scientists have created a non-invasive adhesive patch that promises the measurement of glucose levels through the skin without carrying out the painful finger-pricking blood tests among patients.According to the reports of the World Health Organisation, the world-wide...

10-Apr-2018 London

Anti-epileptic drugs may up Alzheimer's, dementia risk

Older adults who regularly use anti-epileptic drugs may be at an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia, a new study has warned.Anti-epileptic drugs are the main type of treatment for most people with epilepsy that aims to stop seizures from happening....

08-Apr-2018 New York

Muscle loss may up mortality risk in breast cancer patients

Loss of muscle mass in women with breast cancer may increase their risk of mortality, says a study.The findings showed that more than one-third women with sarcopenia -- the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass -- at diagnosis had a significantly increased...

08-Apr-2018 New York

High BP patients prefer pill, tea than exercise

People are more likely to choose a daily cup of tea or a pill over exercise as the preferred treatment to control their high blood pressure, finds a survey.In the survey, 79 per cent of respondents said they would be willing to take a pill for an extra month...

27-Mar-2018 New York

New drug may hold promise in preventing breast, lung cancer

A new drug that may stop a gene associated with obesity from triggering breast and lung cancer, as well as prevent these cancers from growing, is in testing stages, scientists say.The drug, I-BET-762, was found showing signs of significantly delaying the...

26-Mar-2018 London

Bedside chart may ease cancer patient's pain

Patients suffering from cancer can ease the level of their pain by using a simple pen and paper bedside chart, a new study suggests.Pain affects half of the people suffering from cancer and an estimated 80 per cent of those with advanced cancer, causing both...

24-Mar-2018 Tokyo

Knee pain can trigger depression in elderly

Knee pain in the elderly, which can damage the quality of life, can make them prone to depression, researchers say.Osteoarthritis occurs when a joint becomes inflamed, usually because the protective cartilage and other tissues that cushion joints like the...

23-Mar-2018 London

Weight-loss surgery may prevent kidney disease, failure

Undergoing bariatric surgery may significantly lower the risk of developing severe chronic kidney disease and kidney failure, according to a study.Obesity is a dangerous condition and goes hand in hand with elevated blood pressure, cardiovascular diseases and Type-2...

23-Mar-2018 Geneva

Research team finds new anti-cancer protein

Led by an Indian-origin researcher, a team has discovered a new anti-cancer protein that not only prevents the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells in the liver, but also serves as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of liver cancer, according...

22-Mar-2018 London

Protein that can stop cancer identified

Researchers have discovered a protein that prevents the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells in the liver.The anti-cancer protein, called LHPP, can also serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of liver cancer, said the study published in the journal...

22-Mar-2018 New York

Grilled meat can make your BP levels soar : Study

Unable to resist eating at least two servings of grilled, broiled, or roasted fish, chicken or beef a week? Beware! High-temperature cooking releases chemicals that may raise your blood pressure levels, a precursor for many cardiovascular diseases, finds a...

21-Mar-2018 Taipei

Non-steroidal painkillers may harm your heart

Beware of the painkiller you are taking as researchers have found that consumption of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may increase the chances of heart-related complications.According to the researchers, use of NSAIDs was associated with a 18...

21-Mar-2018 New York

High meat intake may up liver disease risk

Meat lovers please take note. Increased consumption of red or processed meat may increase the risk of developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), researchers have found."NAFLD is considered as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome, with...

20-Mar-2018 Gurugram (Haryana)

'Diabetes drug can cut build-up of liver fat'

A drug used to treat Type 2 diabetes could potentially help in reducing liver fat in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and high blood sugar, according to the results of an early trial.In people with Type 2 diabetes, NAFLD is common...

20-Mar-2018 New York

Poor dental health linked to diabetes risk

You may be at an increased risk of diabetes if you are not taking care of your dental health, warns a new study which suggests that dental examination may provide a way to identify the risk for developing the disease."We found a progressive positive relationship...

19-Mar-2018 Seoul

Why breastfeeding is important for high-birthweight infants

New mothers, take note. If you are breastfeeding your high-birthweight infants, you may probably be protecting them from being overweight or obese in childhood, a new study suggests."High birthweight is associated with overweight or obesity during early...

19-Mar-2018 New York

New diabetes drug may help obese to reduce weight

Suffering from obesity? A diabetes drug may help you cut down fat as a compound that mimics a naturally occurring hormone which regulates appetite, researchers say.The compound, semaglutide, has a chemical structure that is very similar to the hormone glucagon-like...

19-Mar-2018 New York

Small dose of Viagra daily may cut colorectal cancer risk

A small, daily dose of the popular erectile dysfunction drug Viagra may significantly reduce colorectal cancer risk, shows a study in mice.Viagra cut in half the formation of polyps, an abnormal and often asymptomatic clump of cells on the lining of the...

18-Mar-2018 New York

Cancer survivors get more easily fatigued : Study

Researchers have found that adults who have undergone successful cancer treatment may become fatigued more quickly than their peers who do not have a history of cancer."The main goal of cancer treatment has been survival, but studies like this suggest that we need...

18-Mar-2018 London

Urological cancer linked to increased risk of suicide

Patients with urological cancer such as prostate, bladder or kidney cancer are five times more likely to commit suicide than people without cancer, new research has found.Severe psychological stress is one of the main side-effects of both a diagnosis of cancer...

17-Mar-2018 London

Omega-3 levels may better predict mortality risk than cholesterol

Measuring the levels of Omega-3 fatty acids present in the blood may indicate the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and mortality more profoundly than serum cholesterol, researchers have claimed.The serum cholesterol level is the total amount of cholesterol...

14-Mar-2018 Hong Kong

Mindfulness meditation may lower major depression risk

Mindfulness meditation training may improves depression symptoms and reduce the incidence of major depression, a new study suggests.Patients with clinically significant symptoms of depression who do not meet the criteria for major depressive disorder or dysthymic...

14-Mar-2018 Tokyo

Smoking may up risk of hearing loss

Smokers beware. You maybe at a higher risk of suffering hearing loss, as a new study suggests that smoking affects the ability to hear both high and low frequency sounds."These results provide strong evidence to support that smoking is a causal factor for hearing...

11-Mar-2018 New York

Scientists identify 36 new genes implicated in cardiac disease

Researchers have identified 36 new genes that plays a causal role in cardiac hypertrophy -- abnormal thickening of the heart muscle -- which can lead to heart failure."This is an exciting direction for personalised medicine, and also for identifying genes and therapeutic...

10-Mar-2018 New York

Stored blood may be unsafe for severely injured patients

Blood stored for long may be less safe for patients with massive blood loss and shock as it may have adverse effects on them, researchers, including one of Indian origin, suggest.The researchers found that for patients who have massive bleeding and receive...

08-Mar-2018 Toronto

Living in sunny climate may cut multiple sclerosis risk

People living in areas which receive more of the Sun's rays are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life, says a study.In MS, the immune system attacks the protective sheath that covers nerve fibres and causes communication problems between...

08-Mar-2018 Tokyo

High Vitamin D levels linked reduced risk of liver cancer

People with higher levels of Vitamin D may be at a lower risk of developing all cancers, specifically liver cancer, a study involving over 30,000 participants has found.Vitamin D is made by the skin in response to sunlight. It helps to maintain calcium levels...

07-Mar-2018 New Delhi

Kidney dysfunction more common in women than men

Chronic kidney disease in India is more common in women than in men, finds a survey by SRL Diagnostics.The survey showed that abnormalities in kidney function was an average of 11.36 per cent higher in women than in men (9.48%) It also showed that kidney function...

07-Mar-2018 New York

Vitamin D deficiency may up forearm fracture risk in kids

Children who are Vitamin D deficient have a greater risk of having more severe forearm fractures requiring surgical treatment, says a study.The study found an important link between low Vitamin D levels and the severity of fractures in children caused by low-energy,...

07-Mar-2018 New York

Women with larger waistline are at higher risk of anxiety

Ladies, take note. If you are middle-aged with some extra kilos you may have an increased chance of developing anxiety, a new study has warned.The study found that women in the middle and upper thirds of waist-to-height ratios were significantly more likely...

06-Mar-2018 New York

Novel blood test may detect Zika more accurately

A new blood test may extend the window of accurate detection from weeks to months after the onset of Zika infection, giving clinicians a powerful new tool to screen for Zika throughout pregnancy, a new study led by an Indian-orgin researcher suggests.Infection...

06-Mar-2018 New York

Babies who look like their father become healthier

What's in the look of a baby? Aren't they all pretty? They are, but some babies have an edge in terms of attracting attention and deriving health benefits, especially if they look like their father, say researchers.The findings, published in the Journal of...

06-Mar-2018 New York

Wearing helmet may reduce spine injury risk during crash

Helmet usage while riding a motorcycle lowers the likelihood of cervical spine injury (CSI), particularly fractures of the cervical vertebrae, a new study has found.Major reasons cited for not requiring helmets while riding a motorcycle include freedom of choice,...

06-Mar-2018 New York

Strong relationships may counter health effects of childhood abuse

A strong and supportive relationship in midlife may act as a buffer against the poor health outcomes as well as premature mortality risk in adulthood for the victims of childhood abuses, researchers have claimed.Childhood abuses has been linked with many...

06-Mar-2018 New York

Smoking during pregnancy linked to asthma severity in kids

Women who smoke while pregnant contribute to the severity of asthma and poor lung function in their children, warns a study.The findings published in the journal CHEST suggest that tobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy is more strongly associated with worse...

06-Mar-2018 New York

New tool may identify risk for post-surgical dislocations

Scientists have developed a new tool that helps to identify which patients undergoing total hip replacement may be at higher risk for an implant dislocation after surgery.The researchers showed that spinal deformity was a significant risk factor for dislocation...

05-Mar-2018 London

Healthy diet may not prevent effects of high salt intake

If you tend to consume a healthy diet just to thwart the effects of high salt intake, think twice. A diet rich in fruits, whole grains and green leafy vegetables, might not balance out the risks caused by foods with higher salt content, researchers have...

05-Mar-2018 London

Heart attacks at weekends more likely to kill young men

Even as the world grapples with the shocking death of Fiorentina captain and Italy international Davide Astori at the age of 31 reportedly due to cardiac arrest, a new study suggests that chances of young men dying of heart attack during the weekend are higher...

04-Mar-2018 New York

Heart failure more likely for some breast cancer survivors

Patients who were treated for breast cancer or lymphoma are more than three times at risk of developing congestive heart failure, compared with patients who did not have cancer, finds a study.Congestive heart failure is when the heart muscle does not pump blood...

04-Mar-2018 Toronto

Your smartphone is damaging the environment, says study

Smartphones and data centres will be the most damaging information and communications technologies to the environment by 2040, warns a new study.For the study, the researchers studied the carbon footprint of consumer devices such as smartphones, laptops, tablets,...

03-Mar-2018 London

Kids with low birth weight at higher risk of heart disease

Children with a birth weight under 2.5 kgs may be at increased risk of becoming underweight and can experience cognitive difficulties as well as diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life, a study says.The researchers found that early iron supplements...

03-Mar-2018 New York

Antibiotic misuse may adversely affect cancer treatment

Long-term antibiotic overuse or misuse may make people drug resistant and vulnerable to infection, impacting cancer treatment efficacy in a negative way, new research suggests.Antibiotic use is known to have a near-immediate impact on our gut microbiota and any...

03-Mar-2018 New York

Young men more vulnerable to mental illness than women

Young men are more likely to experience first-episode psychosis, defined as the first manifestation of one or more severe mental disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, and depression, compared to women of the same age group, says a...

02-Mar-2018 New York

Hormones do not affect girl's gender identity : Study

Prenatal exposure to male hormones influences which activities girls are interested in, but the effects of those hormones do not extend to gender identity, a new study suggests.The researchers explored how prenatal exposure to androgens -- hormones that are typically...

02-Mar-2018 New York

Teachers may help reduce mental health problems in children

Researchers have found that school-based services delivered by teachers and other school-based professionals can help reduce mental health problems in elementary-aged children."Given the limited accessibility of traditional mental health services for children school-based...

02-Mar-2018 New York

Scientists discover new target to treat depression

Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered a new target for treating major depressive disorder.The research shows that individuals with high levels of an enigmatic receptor called GPR158 may be more susceptible to depression following chronic...

02-Mar-2018 New York

New skin cell culture technique developed to study HPV

Researchers have developed a new cell culture strategy that promises to illuminate the mysterious early stages of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection.According to the researchers, most HPV infections cause no symptoms, but certain types of HPV are associated with...

02-Mar-2018 Beijing

Arthritis drug may help lower blood sugar levels

A common rheumatoid arthritis drug may be an effective new therapy for lowering blood glucose levels in patients with Type-2 diabetes, according to a study.Rheumatoid arthritis, affecting approximately one per cent of the worldwide population, is a chronic...

01-Mar-2018 London

Fish oil supplements in pregnancy may cut kids' allergy risk

Babies born to women who took fish oil and probiotic supplements during their second and third trimester of pregnancy may be at reduced risk of suffering from egg allergy and eczema, a study has found.The findings showed that when pregnant women took a daily...

01-Mar-2018 New York

Playing football linked to increased cardiovascular risk

Is football your kids' favourite sport? Beware, playing football regularly may cause structural changes in the heart and elevate the risk of heart rhythm disorders later in life, researchers have warned.The study found that people who play football have...

01-Mar-2018 New York

Drinking 'grassmilk' may boost heart health

Cows fed with 100 per cent organic grass and legume-based diet produce "grassmilk" rich in omega-3, which reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease as compared to conventional milk, finds a study.While omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids are essential human...

01-Mar-2018 New York

'Tummy tuck' reduces back pain after childbearing : Study

Besides restoring the pre-pregnancy shape of the abdomen, abdominoplasty or "tummy tuck" -- a surgical operation involving the removal of excess flesh from the abdomen -- can improve back pain and urinary incontinence after childbearing, a study says.Many women...

28-Feb-2018 London

Metformin during pregnancy may up childhood obesity risk

Kids born to pregnant women who consume metformin -- a medication used for the treatment of gestational diabetes or a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-- are at higher risk of developing obesity, researchers have claimed.The study found that...

28-Feb-2018 New York

50 new gene regions linked to schizophrenia risk identified

Scientists have identified 50 new gene regions that increase the risk of developing schizophrenia, a finding that could lead to improved treatment for the debilitating psychiatric condition that affects over 20 million people worldwide.The study showed that some...

28-Feb-2018 London

Daffodils extract may help combat cancer

Scientists have found that a natural alkaloid extracted from Daffodils has anti-cancer properties, in an advance that may help improve treatments for the deadly disease.The researchers led by Denis Lafontaine, from the Universite libre de Bruxelles in Belgium,...

25-Feb-2018 London

Stem cells may help to stay strong in old age

Researchers have found how an unexpectedly high number of mutations in the stem cells of muscles impair cell regeneration.As we grow older, our muscular function declines. So, according to the researchers, this discovery may result in new medication to build stronger...

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