Updated on Feb 22, 2018 22:04:24

 

 

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20-Feb-2018 San Francisco

Google AI shows how eyes could reveal heart attack risk

Knowing the risk of a heart attack or a stroke could soon become as simple as an eye test as researchers at Google and its health-tech arm Verily have found that Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) could help identify signals of heart diseases...

19-Feb-2018 Washington

Sleep problems in menopause linked to hot flashes, depression

A study of middle-aged women by the University of Illinois (UI) found that sleep problems vary across the stages of menopause, yet are consistently correlated with hot flashes and depression.The UI researchers used data from the Midlife Women's Health...

19-Feb-2018 London

Excess calcium in your brains' may up Parkinson's risk

While calcium helps to build and protect your bones, excess levels of the mineral in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic clusters that are the hallmark of Parkinson's disease, finds a study.Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that...

19-Feb-2018 London

Novel blood, urine tests may predict autism in kids

In a first of its kind, scientists have developed novel tests that can indicate autism in children, a finding that could lead to earlier diagnosis of the developmental disorder that impairs the ability to communicate and interact.The new blood and urine...

17-Feb-2018 New York

Common BP drug may prevent onset of Type 1 diabetes

A drug commonly used drug to control high blood pressure may be also effective in preventing the onset of Type 1 diabetes in up to 60 per cent of those at risk, researchers say.The drug, methyldopa, has been used for over 50 years to treat high blood pressure...

16-Feb-2018 New York

Heart surgery in infants may cause deafness

Children who have undergone heart surgery as infants may risk hearing loss by the age of four, in addition to poor language skills and cognitive problems, researchers have found.Researchers discovered that around 21 per cent of 348 pre-schoolers, who had survived...

15-Feb-2018 New York

Maternal deficiency of Vitamin D may up childhood obesity risk

Babies born to women who suffered from Vitamin D deficiency during their pregnancy are more likely to develop obesity in childhood as well as in adulthood, a study has found.Children born to mothers with very low Vitamin D levels during their first trimester...

15-Feb-2018 New York

Eating yogurt may reduce risk of heart diseases

Higher intake of yogurt may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease among hypertensive men and women, a new study suggests.According to the researchers, clinical trials have previously demonstrated beneficial effects of dairy consumption on cardiovascular...

14-Feb-2018 New York

Manipulating gut bacteria may cut obesity, diabetes risk

Manipulating levels and ratios of gut bacteria can help prevent obesity and diabetes -- a common risk factor for developing cardiovascular diseases, finds a new study.The study with the rodent equivalent of metabolic syndrome showed evidence that the intestinal microbiome...

14-Feb-2018 New York

How materialism may harm your married life

Do you often end up having heated discussions with your spouse over money matters? Beware, your fondness for material possessions may affect your love life and push your marriage towards an unhappy ending, says a new study.The study found that when materialism...

14-Feb-2018 New York

A soda a day may cut your chances of conceiving

Planning a baby? Then stop drinking soda or sugar-sweetened beverages, as intake of one or more such drinks a day -- by either partner -- may decrease the chances of conceiving, warns a study.The findings showed both female and male intake of sugar-sweetened...

14-Feb-2018 New York

This 'selfish' gene may prevent heart disease

Scientists have identified a "selfish" gene that can potentially remove cholesterol from blood vessels and help prevent heart disease.The gene, called MeXis, acts within key cells inside clogged arteries to help remove excess cholesterol from blood vessels.In mice,...

13-Feb-2018 London

Childhood sibling bullying triples schizophrenia risk later

Individuals who were bullied by their siblings during childhood could be up to three times more likely to develop psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia in early adulthood, says new research.The study found that the more often children are involved in sibling...

11-Feb-2018 New York

Ultrasound, blood test together may boost liver cancer detection

Earlier detection is important to improving survival of patients with liver cancer, and combining an ultrasound imaging with a blood test can help  achieve that, say researchers, including one of Indian-origin.Using ultrasound and a blood test for high...

11-Feb-2018 New York

Your body could soon power wearable devices

Researchers have developed a metallic tab which, when connected to a human body, is capable of generating electricity from bending a finger and other simple movements.According to a research project led by the University at Buffalo, New York, and Institute of Semiconductors...

08-Feb-2018 New York

Diet may help halt breast cancer spread : Study

Limiting the intake of foods rich in asparagine including dairy, beef, poultry, eggs, fish, nuts, soy and whole grains, while increasing the intake of fruits and vegetables may potentially help halt the spread of a deadly type of breast cancer, researchers, including...

07-Feb-2018 London

Early Briton had dark skin, blue eyes : Study

A Briton from 10,000 years ago had blue eyes, dark coloured curly hair and "dark to black" skin pigmentation, shows DNA analysis of Cheddar Man, Britain's oldest nearly complete skeleton.The findings suggests that the lighter pigmentation now considered...

06-Feb-2018 New York

Zika brain damage may go undetected in pregnancy : Study

The damage caused by the Zika virus could go undetected in pregnancy and may later lead to learning disorders, psychiatric illnesses and dementia in babies, researchers including one of Indian-origin has found.The findings, appearing in the journal Nature...

06-Feb-2018 London

Dye could offer treatment for malaria patients

Methylene blue -- used as medication and dye -- could act as a safe anti-malarial that kills malaria parasites at an unprecedented rate, results from a clinical trial have revealed.Every year, malaria infects more than 200 million people and causes more than 430,000...

04-Feb-2018 New York

Chronic diseases raise cancer, mortality risk

Several common chronic diseases including hypertention, heart disease and diabetes, together account for more than a fifth of new cancer cases and more than a third of cancer deaths, finds a study.Chronic diseases were responsible for 71 per cent of deaths globally...

01-Feb-2018 New York

Cancer 'vaccine' found effective in mice

Raising hopes for a cancer vaccine for different types of cancers, researchers have found that injecting minute amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumours in mice can eliminate all traces of cancer in the animals.A clinical trial was...

31-Jan-2018 London

Traumatic brain injury linked to dementia risk even after 30 years

People who suffer a traumatic brain injury -- occurring when an external force injures the brain -- may be at increased risk of developing dementia even after 30 years, says a study.A traumatic brain injury, also known as intracranial injury, is the leading...

31-Jan-2018 New York

Brain pacemaker to help Alzheimer's patients

In a first, US researchers have developed a brain pacemaker that could slow down the decline in problem-solving and decision-making skills in patients with Alzheimer's disease.The brain pacemaker, similar to a cardiac pacemaker device, consists of thin...

31-Jan-2018 New York

Vitamin D3 may heal or prevent damage to your heart

Are you suffering from heart disease? A treatment with Vitamin D3 might help restore damage to your cardiovascular system, finds a study.Vitamin D3 is produced naturally when skin is exposed to the sun or through over-the-counter pills. Several diseases,...

31-Jan-2018 New York

Bacteria in milk may trigger rheumatoid arthritis : Study

Researchers have found that a strain of bacteria commonly found in milk may be a trigger for developing rheumatoid arthritis in people who are genetically at risk.Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune and inflammatory disease that causes the immune system to attack...

17-Jan-2018 London

Egyptian 'Two Brothers' mummies were half-siblings : Study

Scientists have found that the 4,000-year-old Egyptian "Two Brothers" mummies, long believed to be of brothers from the same father actually shared a maternal relationship.The study showed that the mummies -- of two elite men named Khnum-Nakht and Nakht-Ankh --...

17-Jan-2018 New Delhi

Communities in Rajasthan have high tolerance for wildlife : Study

Communities living near wildlife reserves in Rajasthan show a high tolerance for wildlife, comprising larger carnivores such as leopard and wolves. This is despite experiencing loss to crops and livestock, a study said on Wednesday.Almost 85 per cent of locals who...

13-Jan-2018 Singapore

How gut bacteria, broccoli can help keep bowel cancer away

Researchers have developed a cocktail of bacteria and cruciferous vegetables that can potentially turn into a targeting system that seeks out and kills colorectal cancer cells.Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide, after lung and prostate cancer.Although...

11-Jan-2018 New York

Depression in older adults with high BP may delay recovery

Antidepressants may fail to work properly in older adults suffering from high blood pressure and high blood sugar levels, finds a study.Older adults who have major depressive disorder (MDD, also known as depression) are at higher risk for having problems thinking and...

10-Jan-2018 Washington

Frozen embryos as good as fresh ones in IVF pregnancies : Study

The success rate of frozen embryo transfers for in vitro fertilization (IVF) is almost the same as, or even better than, those using fresh ones, researchers said on Wednesday."Frozen embryo techniques are growing in popularity in fertility clinics worldwide,"...

10-Jan-2018 New York

Paracetamol in pregnancy may delay daughters' language skills

Women who consume acetaminophen -- also known as paracetamol and widely used to reduce a high fever or relieve pain -- during early pregnancy are six times more likely to see delay in their daughters' language skills, warns a new study.Acetaminophen is the...

09-Jan-2018 New York

Touring for work too often can up anxiety, depression risk

Do you travel for business assignments for two weeks or more in a month? According to a study, such people are more likely to suffer from symptoms of anxiety and depression and are also likely to smoke, be sedentary and have trouble sleeping.The findings...

08-Jan-2018 New York

Weight-loss surgery may cut heart disease risk among adolescents

Bariatric surgery may minimise the risk of heart diseases in adolescents who went through the procedure, claimed new research.The findings showed that bariatric or weight-loss surgery performed during adolescence may provide unique benefits later in life by minimising...

06-Jan-2018 London

Thirty minutes of sauna bath may reduce hypertension : Study

Suffering from hypertension? Taking a sauna bath of 30 minutes may help reduce blood pressure levels, according to a study.The study showed that immediately after 30 minutes of sauna bathing, participants' mean systolic blood pressure (the top number) reduced...

05-Jan-2018 Toronto

Childhood asthma, food allergy may up anxiety disorder risk

If your child is suffering from chronic illness such as asthma or food allergy, he or she is more likely to develop anxiety or other mental health disorders, finds a studyThe findings showed that anxiety disorders were most common, including separation...

04-Jan-2018 New York

Dietary sugar linked to spread of superbug : Study

A dietary sugar approved as a food additive for use in foods from sushi and vegetables to ice cream may have fuelled the frequency and severity of a deadly superbug, scientists say.The findings showed that trehalose, used in foods as a sweetener, a stabiliser...

03-Jan-2018 Beijing

Baby formula from cow's milk may not up diabetes risk : Study

Drinking formula made from cow's milk may not put babies at higher risk of developing Type 1 diabetes, the first large international trial showed.Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the...

01-Jan-2018 London

Diabetes drug can also cure Alzheimer's disease

Scientists have found that a drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's disease through a triple method of action.The drug, originally created to treat type 2 diabetes, "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice, a paper published in the journal...

29-Dec-2017 New York

Epilepsy drug in pregnancy ups oral cleft risk in baby : Study

Women taking a common anti-epileptic drug during early pregnancy may have a greater chance of giving birth to a baby with an oral cleft, warns a new study."Our results suggest that the increased risk of oral clefts is most pronounced in women taking higher...

26-Dec-2017 London

How fibre-rich food could cut diabetes, bowel disease risk

Regularly consuming a Western-type diet, which are high in fats and sugars but low in fibre, may increase the risk of inflammatory bowel diseases, weight gain, as well as diabetes, researchers say.he findings showed that fibre -- found in fruits, legumes, vegetables...

23-Dec-2017 New York

Interest in sex peaks significantly during Christmas : Study

Interest in "sex" or other sexual terms in online searches rises significantly during Christmas festivities, with more births nine months later, an interesting study has revealed.It's often wryly observed that birth rates peak in September, with many studies...

22-Dec-2017 Toronto

Brief burst of exercise can boost your brain power

Students may please take note that exercising for a brief period before writing a test or going for an interview may improve performance. Researchers have found that just 10 minutes of exercise can prime the parts of the brain that help us focus and solve problems."Some...

22-Dec-2017 London

Singing carols can make you happy, boost mental health

Love to be part of the choir singing Christmas carols? Singing in groups could not only make you happier, but also help improve mental health conditions like anxiety and depression, according to new research.The finding showed that people who took part in...

20-Dec-2017 London

Gay teenagers at five times more risk of suicides : Study

Gay teenagers were almost five times as likely to show a higher prevalence for suicide-risk behaviour than their heterosexual peers, a research has showed.The findings showed that one in four or 40 per cent of gay, lesbian, bisexual or questioning (LGBQ)...

20-Dec-2017 New Delhi

Nearly 57 percent people plan their workouts impulsively : Study

Nearly 57 percent gym goers plan their workouts impulsively, usually within an hour, says a yearlong study done by one stop solution for fitness enthusiasts fitpass.The survey covered a wide range of areas including fitness goals; favourite workouts of users,...

19-Dec-2017 London

Fungi made life on Earth possible : Study

Life on earth would have been impossible without the humble fungi, as they played an essential role in the creation of an oxygen-rich atmosphere, claims a study.The study showed that fungi played a critical part in establishing a breathable atmosphere on...

17-Dec-2017 Sydney

Cave paintings treasure trove found on Indonesian island

Researchers have found that a tiny Indonesian island, previously unexplored by archaeologists, is very rich in ancient cave paintings dating from at least 2,500 years ago.The team uncovered a total of 28 rock art sites on the island of Kisar which measures just...

16-Dec-2017 New York

Women more likely to be sidelined at workplace : Study

Love to toss creative ideas in the brainstorming session at your workplace? If you are a women, beware, you are more likely to receive less credit than your male counterparts, new research revealed.The findings showed that when it comes time to replace the...

14-Dec-2017 Lucknow

WHO birth checklist fails to cut UP's death rate : Study

A checklist and coaching programme designed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) to improve birth outcomes and target the major causes of death in Uttar Pradesh -- India's most populous state and among those with highest birth-related mortality rates...

13-Dec-2017 New York

1% most visited websites likely to be hacked every year : Study

Unravelling just how vulnerable your details on your favourite websites are, a new study says that out of the top 1000 most visited sites on the Internet, ten are likely to be hacked every year."No one is above this - companies or nation states -- it's going to...

12-Dec-2017 New York

Kidney disease may up risk of diabetes: Study

If you are suffering from kidney dysfunction, you may be at high risk of developing diabetes, finds a study.The risk may be attributed to the rising level of urea -- the nitrogen-containing waste product in blood, which comes from the breakdown of protein...

11-Dec-2017 London

Anesthetics could affect plants too : Study

Plants react to anesthetics similar to the way animals and humans do, finds a study suggesting that they are ideal objects for testing anesthetics actions in future.Anesthetics were first used in the 19th century when it was discovered that inhaling ether gas...

09-Dec-2017 London

Viagra not effective for foetal growth complications : Study

Anti-impotency Viagra drug used to prevent serious growth complications affecting babies in the womb is ineffective, finds a study.Foetal growth restriction, commonly called intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), is a complicated pregnancy condition, in which a baby...

08-Dec-2017 New York

Canola oil may be harmful for the brain : Study

Two tablespoons of canola oil daily may worsen memory, learning ability as well as cause weight gain in people with Alzheimer's disease, claims a study.The study, conducted on mice, suggested that the long term consumption of the vegetable oil which is often...

07-Dec-2017 New York

Poor sleep may up depression risk

If your teenaged son or daughter is regularly waking up till late in the night, he or she is likely to have poor sleep, which may increase their risk of developing mood disorders, especially depression, researchers have warned.The study, led by Peter Franzen...

07-Dec-2017 Washington

Clay on Red Planet due to Martian crust, not water : Study

Clay minerals on Mars could have formed during the creation of the Martian crust itself, long before any water flowed on the planet, suggests new research that could rewrite the early history of the Red Planet."One of the complications that comes up in Mars...

07-Dec-2017 Lucknow

Common painkillers linked to obesity risk, poor sleep : Study

If you are regularly in the habit of popping up over-the-counter painkillers, beware, you may be at double the risk of becoming obese as well as have poor sleep, a study has revealed.Over the past 10 years, there has been a large increase in the prescription...

07-Dec-2017 New York

Stressed cocoa trees produce more flavourful chocolate : Study

Chocolates taste great, but they can become even tastier when the cocoa trees are grown in dry season and in high-stressed conditions, new research suggests.But more than the agricultural methods, the weather conditions in which cocoa trees are grown could have...

06-Dec-2017 New York

Artificial ovaries can better treat menopause symptoms : Study

Implanting artificial ovaries may be a more safer, natural and effective alternative in menopausal women who face hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and bone deterioration due to the loss of ovarian function, a mice study has suggested.Women experiencing...

06-Dec-2017 New York

HPV raises reinfection risk to 20 times in men : Study

Men infected with one type of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) may be at 20 times more at risk of reinfection with the same type, researchers say.HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection and it is a major cause of genital warts and cancers...

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