Updated on Mar 27, 2017 17:19:33

 

 

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26-Mar-2017 London

Stem cell therapy restores sexual function in impotent men

Stem cell therapy can restore sufficient erectile function to allow previously impotent men to have spontaneous intercourse, show results of an early clinical trial."What we have done establishes that this technique can lead to men recovering a spontaneous...

26-Mar-2017 Kolkata

'Repurposing' malaria drug to treat castrate-resistant prostate cancer

Tapping into the trend of repurposing old approved drugs to treat totally different diseases -- a strategy that led to the development of Viagra, researchers at IIT-Kanpur have shown how a malaria drug can be used to tackle drug resistance in metastatic prostate...

25-Mar-2017 New York

10 minutes of vigorous exercise will boost kids' heart health

Encouraging your children to engage in as little as 10 minutes a day in high-intensity physical activity could help them reduce their risk of developing heart problems and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, researchers say.The findings showed that replacing light-intensity...

25-Mar-2017 New Delhi

Is your hair summer ready?

Summers are a great time to be out in the sun, feel the sand under your feet and soak in the warm summer breeze but its not just skin that needs to be protected in the scorching weather but also hair. One can follow some do it yourself remedies like hot oil...

25-Mar-2017 Toronto

Childhood brain tumour survivor's high body fat ups stroke risk

Survivors of childhood brain tumours have more body fat, increasing their risk of stroke, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and early death, research has shown.The study showed that although survivors of childhood brain tumours -- the second most common type of cancers...

21-Mar-2017 New York

No dilating required with this pocket-sized retina camera

A team of researchers has developed a cheap, portable camera that can photograph the retina without the need for pupil-dilating eye drops.Made out of simple parts mostly available online, the camera's total cost is about $185."As residents seeing patients...

20-Mar-2017 Toronto

Your high BP might just be a case of misdiagnosis

Nearly 20 per cent of people receiving treatment for hypertension do not actually have a problem, but they are often misdiagnosed as a result of doctors using manual devices to measure blood pressure, a study has showed."About 20 per cent of people receiving...

19-Mar-2017 Mumbai

New hope for cancer care as Bengaluru lab cracks tricky biopsy

In a development that could transform the management of cancer patients, a Bengaluru-based laboratory has claimed to have cracked the difficulties related to tracing malignant cells and avoid repeated biopsies.Doctors often are forced to conduct repeated...

19-Mar-2017 New York

Harder calcium deposits may predict heart attack risk

People with proportionately higher quantities of harder calcified plaque best predicted risk of heart attacks, while soft plaque did not, representing a potential paradigm shift, researchers said.The study may be a "game-changer" for determining who is at risk...

19-Mar-2017 Beijing

Diabetes drug may help treat breast cancer

Chinese researchers have found that a drug used to treat diabetes could be effective against a form of breast cancer.Over 70,000 people die from breast cancer in China every year, according to the national cancer centre.Triple-negative breast cancer is particularly...

19-Mar-2017 New York

Your expertise may raise risk of mistakes when interrupted

If you are highly skilled at your workplace, chances are that your expertise can prove to be a risk factor for procedural errors in environments with a high incidence of task interruption, researchers say.The study conducted by researchers in the Michigan...

18-Mar-2017 New York

Sleep apnea in kids may affect mental skills, behaviour

Children with chronically disrupted sleep are likely to have defects in their brain cells that are associated with mental skills, mood and behaviour, researchers have warned.Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disturbance which affects up to five per cent...

18-Mar-2017 New York

Evolocumab, added to statins may help lower cholesterol

A new class of cholesterol-lowering drug, when added to statin therapy could cut cholesterol levels by almost 60 per cent on average in patients with an underlying risk of cardiovascular disease such as heart atack or stroke, a study has found.In the study,...

18-Mar-2017 Sydney

Maternal Vitamin D levels may prevent autism in kids

Intake of Vitamin D supplements during the first trimester of pregnancy is likely to prevent the development of autism traits in children, researchers found in a study on mice.Autism -- or autism spectrum disorder -- describes lifelong developmental disabilities...

16-Mar-2017 New York

Whole-body vibration may help combat obesity, diabetes

Indulging in a less strenuous form of exercise known as whole-body vibration could mimic the muscle and bone health benefits of regular exercise and help combat obesity and diabetes, according to a new study.Whole-body vibration consists of a person sitting, standing...

16-Mar-2017 Toronto

Failed IVF treatment may up heart disease risk

Women who undergo fertility therapy, but do not get pregnant, may be at a higher risk of developing long-term cardiovascular disease, compared to women who become pregnant, a new study has found.According to researchers, the drugs used for the fertility treatments...

14-Mar-2017 New Delhi

Rare joint-replacement surgery enables man walk after decade

In the world's second such case, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) here has given a new lease of life to a 20-year-old man by performing a rare quadruple joint replacement surgery that enabled him to sit and walk after more than a decade.The...

14-Mar-2017 New York

New hormone test may distinguish schizophrenia, depression

US researchers have developed a new hormone-based test that can better distinguish between the symptoms of depression and schizophrenia.Depression is thought to affect over 300 million people worldwide and schizophrenia affects as many as 51 million people....

14-Mar-2017 Kolkata

Bengal health regulatory bill turns spotlight on guidelines for ICUs

Beware, a trip to the ICU may not necessarily ensure better treatment but could actually leave you high and dry in terms of money and health, warn experts ranged against unscrupulous private hospitals taking advantage of unsuspecting patients in the absence...

14-Mar-2017 London

MRI scans may help spot HIV in the brain

Despite effective drug treatment, HIV may still persist in the brain and lead to cognitive problems. But, tracking the changes to the brain's white matter using MRI scans can help spot the deadly virus, say researchers including one of Indian-origin.According...

14-Mar-2017 London

Having children may increase your lifespan

Although parenthood may have its share of woes, it could also hold the key to long life, particularly in older age, when health and capacity may start to decline, finds a new study.The findings suggested that the risks of death were lower among those who had...

12-Mar-2017 New York

Severe hypoglycemia may up death risk in diabetics

Even a single episode of severe hypoglycemic condition -- having low blood glucose levels -- may be associated with nearly double the risk of cardiovascular disease or death in older adults with Type 2 diabetes, a study has found.Diabetes is a condition marked...

12-Mar-2017 New York

Childhood bullying may up heart disease, diabetes risk

Being bullied during childhood might have lifelong health effects related to chronic stress exposure, including an increased risk for heart disease and diabetes in adulthood, a study has showed.Bullying -- a classic form of chronic social stress -- could have...

11-Mar-2017 New York

Rapid BP drop in middle age linked to dementia later

Middle-aged people who experience rapid drop in blood pressure often causing dizziness may be at an increased risk of developing cognitive decline and dementia 20 years later, a study said.The findings suggest that these temporary episodes -- known as orthostatic...

10-Mar-2017 New York

Consuming gluten-free food may up diabetes risk

Individuals who regularly eat gluten-free foods such as starch-containing rice, cassava, corn, soy among others, may be at a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, compared to those who eat gluten-rich foods, according to new research.Gluten, a protein found...

10-Mar-2017 Moscow

Why do people develop high blood pressure?

Early life changes in brain activity and blood flow may be the reason why people tend to develop abnormally high blood pressure, or hypertension, researchers said.High blood pressure is a condition in which the force of the blood against the artery walls is...

10-Mar-2017 London

Using hormonal contraceptives may up breast cancer risk

Although age has been an important risk factor of breast cancer, a study said post-menopausal women who used a hormonal intrauterine device were at 52 per cent increased risk of the disease, when compared to those who used copper a device.The findings showed...

08-Mar-2017 New York

Molecular gel to halt spread of snake venom, cut treatment cost

Researchers have developed a novel molecular gel that could neutralise deadly snake venom more cheaply and effectively than with traditional anti-venom -- an innovation that could spare millions of people the loss of life or limbs each year.Worldwide, an estimated...

08-Mar-2017 New York

Diabetes ups death risk from cancer in Asians

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with a 26 per cent increase in the risk of death from cancers of kidney, thyroid, liver and prostate in Asians, including Indians, warn researchers.Previous research had suggested that at any given body mass index (BMI),...

07-Mar-2017 New York

Behind every satisfied career is good sex at home

Maintaining a healthy sex life at home can boost your job satisfaction and engagement at the office, says a study.Sexual intercourse triggers the release of dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with the reward centres in the brain, as well as oxytocin, a neuropeptide...

07-Mar-2017 New York

Researchers turn waste tomatoes into tires

Tires of the future could come from the farm as much as the factory as researchers have found a way to turn waste tomato peels and eggshells into sustainable rubber.The researchers discovered that food waste can partially replace carbon black, the petroleum-based...

06-Mar-2017 New York

Soy may boost survival in some breast cancer patients

Eating dietary soy products may be safe as well as beneficial for some women diagnosed with breast cancer, new research has found.Soy foods are considered among the healthiest for human consumption, but their estrogen-like properties -- found in isoflavones...

06-Mar-2017 Sydney

Early periods may up gestational diabetes risk

Girls who start their first period at age 11 or younger are 50 per cent more likely to develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy than those who experienced it at the age of 13, researchers, including one of Indian-origin, say.Gestational diabetes is an...

06-Mar-2017 New York

Researchers identify genetic links to gallbladder cancer

A team of researchers from India and the US has identified several gene variants which may predispose individuals to develop gallbladder cancer.Although gallbladder cancer is rare in most parts of the world, it is far more common among some ethnic groups,...

05-Mar-2017 Toronto

Low salt intake may up heart failure risk : Study

Health guidelines on salt intake recommend consumption levels that are too low and this may increase the risk of a fatal heart attack, researchers, led by one of Indian-origin, have warned.According to current guidelines issued by the World Health Organisation,...

05-Mar-2017 New York

That sleep tracking device may be ruining your sleep

Unable to get proper sleep at night? Blame that sleep tracking app, as a new study has revealed that wearable sleep tracking devices such as Fitbit or Apple Watch, designed to help people track sleep, may actually be keeping people awake.The findings showed...

04-Mar-2017 New York

Yoga could replace antidepressants

If you are diagnosed with depression, just take a deep breath and join yoga classes to experience significant reduction in symptoms without the side effects associated with antidepressants, new research suggests."This study supports the use of a yoga and...

03-Mar-2017 London

Smoking causes lungs to lose their ability to heal

Are you a chain smoker? Beware. Cigarette smoke has the potential to block self-healing processes in the lungs by eroding molecules responsible for the renewal of lung cells and certain proteins essential for breathing, consequently leading to chronic obstructive...

03-Mar-2017 London

Artificial mammal 'embryo' created from stem cells

For the first time, scientists at the University of Cambridge have managed to create an artificial structure from stem cells that resembles a natural mouse embryo.The findings could pave the way for developing artificial human life in the lab and help researchers...

03-Mar-2017 London

New method may improve treatment for irregular heart rate

Researchers have developed a new algorithm to identify the origin of irregular electrical 'storm waves' in the heart, a finding with major implications for the future treatment of a killer cardiac disease.Atrial Fibrillation -- one of the most common forms of abnormal...

02-Mar-2017 Bengaluru

Syngene to co-develop nutrition products for Herbalife

Nutrition major Herbalife and contract research firm Syngene on Thursday announced setting up a research and development (R&D) centre to make nutrition products for Indian consumers.Located in Syngene's campus on the city's southern outskirts, the hi-tech...

02-Mar-2017 London

Why a sitting job is bad for your heart and waist

Do you have a desk-bound job? Beware, you may be at a heightened risk of developing cardiovascular diseases by 0.2 per cent and an increase in waist circumference by two cm, for every additional hour of sitting on top of five hours, researchers warned.The...

01-Mar-2017 New York

Too much soda may put teenagers at breast cancer risk later

Teenagers who consume a diet low in vegetables and high in sugar-sweetened and diet soft drinks may be at increased risk for premenopausal breast cancer, warns a study.Women who consumed a diet as adolescents or young adults associated with chronic inflammation...

28-Feb-2017 New Delhi

How to choose sunscreen for your skin

It is important to check if the sunscreen suits your skin type because exposure to Ultraviolet (UV) rays can lead to skin issues like tanning, says an expert.Rohit Batra, dermatologist at Dermaworld Skin and Hair Clinic, has rolled out a few pointers that...

27-Feb-2017 New Delhi

Removal of testicles can save men with fourth-stage prostate cancer

Initially, 62-year-old Ram Mathur did not feel any symptoms. When he started feeling some difficulty during urination, he chose to ignore it. The problem took an extreme turn when he started noticing swellings in the pelvic region, followed by blood in semen, decreased...

26-Feb-2017 London

Does reading maps make you nervous? Blame your genes

If the very thought of spatial and mathematical tasks, such as reading a map or solving a geometry problem, makes you nervous, it could be partly due to your genes, suggests a new research."Our results have important implications for finding specific genes...

26-Feb-2017 New York

Vitamin in milk could prevent pain caused by chemotherapy

A vitamin found in milk may be useful for treating or preventing nerve pain caused by chemotherapy drugs, says a study.For the study, the researchers tested the effect of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a form of vitamin B3, in female rats that were treated...

26-Feb-2017 New York

Neanderthal DNA influences our height, schizophrenia risk : Study

Although the last Neanderthal died tens of thousands years ago, their DNA sequences still influence how genes are turned on or off in modern humans, and their effects can contribute to traits such as height and susceptibility to schizophrenia or lupus, says a...

24-Feb-2017 New York

Heel-to-ground foot makes us better fighters, slow runners

Standing with heels planted allows humans more swinging force when fighting, but the heel-down posture also makes us bad at fleeing, says a study.In contrast, many other species of mammals, including most primates, stand, walk and run with their heels elevated,...

24-Feb-2017 Sydney

Back pain ups risk of early death by 13%

Suffering from lower back pain? Be careful, back pain -- approximately affecting 700 million people worldwide -- is the leading cause of disability globally and may increase your risk of dying early by 13 per cent, researchers warn.The findings showed that compared...

23-Feb-2017 New York

Asthma drugs may prevent a deadly form of pneumonia

Two drugs that are used to treat asthma and allergies may offer a way to prevent a form of pneumonia that can kill up to 40 per cent of people who contract it, researchers have found.Influenza pneumonia results when a flu infection spreads to alveolar air...

21-Feb-2017 New York

Eating mercury rich fish may up neurological disease risk

Love to eat fish and other seafood? Be careful, as eating mercury-rich fish such as shark and swordfish may increase the risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) -- that takes away the ability of nerve cells to interact with the body's muscles...

20-Feb-2017 Chandigarh

Chandigarh Doctor Recieves International Recognition

Chandigarh based Dr Sonica Krishan was recently presented with the "50 Outstanding Women in Healthcare – Global Listing" citation at a summit organised at Taj Lands End, Mumbai this week by the World Health & Wellness Congress & Awards which was attended...

19-Feb-2017 New Delhi

Your paunch may well hide cardiac risks

A typical young Indian male marries, and a few months later he develops a noticeable paunch. His mother and mother-in-law are pleased as punch, perceiving the paunch as a sign of his wellbeing of his being "looked after well" by his wife.But is it all...

18-Feb-2017 Kochi

Kochi hospital performs dual live-donor transplant in a toddler

In a first, a 20-month-old girl, weighing just seven kgs, got a new lease of life after doctors here performed a complex surgery where live-donor liver and kidney transplant took place simultaneously.This is the first time in the world that a dual live-donor...

18-Feb-2017 London

30-min walk boosts positivity in advanced cancer patients

For patients in the advanced stages of cancer, walking for at least 30 minutes thrice a week may boost a positive attitude towards their illness and improve their quality of life, new research claims.Despite growing evidence of significant health benefits...

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